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Bill Riley has the 12th and 14th best individual scoring seasons in CHS boys basketball history. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Three players, seven of the best seasons. L to r are Randy Keefe (#7, #8, #50), Bill Jarrell (#5, #21), and Jeff Rhubottom (#2, #33). (Renae Mulholland photo)

There is no question the ’70s were a golden period for Coupeville High School boys basketball.

It started with the 1969-1970 Wolves, who were the first Whidbey Island hoops team to win a district title, the first CHS squad to go to state, and still the highest-scoring group in program history, 50 years later.

But that was just the beginning.

Whether we look at team accomplishments or individual achievement, the Me Decade players stand head and shoulders above everyone else.

That’s reflected when we look back at the 50 best single-season scoring totals put up by any Wolf hoops player.

Despite playing with no three-point line, while wearing short-shorts, ’70s players account for 19 of those slots.

No other decade even reaches double-digits, with the ’90s and 2000’s accounting for eight apiece.

The ’50s give us five, the ’60s four, and tied for last it’s the ’80s and 2010’s, which land just three top-50 performances.

Randy Keefe, who is #3 in career scoring, is the only Wolf to have three top-50 seasons, landing at #7, #8, and #50.

The only thing keeping him from making it 4-for-4? Freshmen weren’t allowed to play varsity basketball in the early ’70s.

There are 12 other Wolves who managed to crack the top 50 twice in their career, including Jeff Stone and Jeff Rhubottom, who own the best two individual performances.

Others occupying two slots include Bill Jarrell, Mike Bagby, Bill Riley, Hunter Smith, Gavin Keohane, Denny Clark, Jack Elzinga, Rich Morris, Chris Good, and Mike Criscoula.

Overall, 36 players have combined to account for the top 50 individual seasons.

As always when we discuss the 103-year history of the CHS boys basketball program, however, there is one small caveat.

We’re still missing a full season of scoring stats for Elzinga and two for Tom Sahli, who has the 39th best campaign in our semi-complete overview.

With that being said, the 50 best single-season scoring totals:

 

Jeff Stone – (644) – (1969-1970)
Jeff Rhubottom – (459) – (1977-1978)
Pete Petrov (442) – (1995-1996)
Arik Garthwaite – (423) – (1997-1998)
Bill Jarrell – (415) – (1975-1976)
Mike Bagby – (414) – (2004-2005)
Randy Keefe – (398) – (1974-1975)
Randy Keefe – (397) – (1975-1976)
Brad Sherman – (396) – (2002-2003)
Wade Ellsworth – (392) – (1978-1979)
Del O’Shell – (391) – (1981-1982)
Bill Riley – (388) – (1972-1973)
Joe Whitney – (388) – (1979-1980)
Bill Riley – (386) – (1971-1972)
Pat Clark – (384) – (1956-1957)
Hunter Smith – (382) – (2017-2018)
Cody Peters – (380) – (2008-2009)
Gavin Keohane – (374) – (1997-1998)
Denny Clark – (365) – (1963-1964)
Mike Bagby – (364) – (2005-2006)
Bill Jarrell – (357) – (1974-1975)
Gabe McMurray – (355) – (1994-1995)
Foster Farris – (348) – (1976-1977)
Timm Orsborn – (345) – (1987-1988)
Roy Marti – (342) – (1978-1979)
Virgil Roehl – (341) – (1992-1993)
Pat Bennett – (340) – (1999-2000)
Jack Elzinga – (337) – (1954-1955)
Steve Whitney – (337) – (1978-1979)
Corey Cross – (333) – (1970-1971)
Hunter Smith – (332) – (2016-2017)
Rich Morris – (328) – (1995-1996)
Jeff Rhubottom – (325) – (1976-1977)
Denny Clark – (319) – (1962-1963)
Randy Duggan – (319) – (1971-1972)
Chris Good – (319) – (2001-2002)
Jeff Stone – (317) – (1968-1969)
Dan Nieder – (313) – (1987-1988)
Tom Sahli – (310) – (1952-1953)
Jack Elzinga – (309) – (1955-1956)
Rich Morris – (309) – (1996-1997)
Mike Criscuola – (306) – (1958-1959)
Allen Black – (305) – (2003-2004)
Mike Criscuola – (305) – (1959-1960)
Chris Good – (305) – (2000-2001)
Marc Bissett – (302) – (1975-1976)
Hunter Hammer – (302) – (2009-2010)
Gavin Keohane – (300) – (1998-1999)
Pat O’Grady – (296) – (1969-1970)
Randy Keefe – (293) – (1973-1974)

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Bob Rea, the strikeout king of Snakelum Point. (Photo courtesy Rea)

Records are set to be broken.

You only have to look as far as the big board for track and field which sits just inside the entrance of the Coupeville High School gym.

Over the years, all-time greats such as Jon Chittim, Makana Stone, and Virgil Roehl set marks which seemed untouchable.

And yet, over time, most of those accomplishments have been surpassed, a testament to hard work, changes in training, and maybe all those hormones in the milk.

Yes, a few marks have endured decades — there are still records from the ’80s up there — and it’s the same in every sport.

Will anyone ever touch Ian Barron’s nearly-untouchable rushing records on the CHS football board?

Unlikely, but hey, once upon a time, we thought no one would reach Chad Gale’s receiving marks, and yet Hunter Smith eventually did.

It’s the same with volleyball records set by big-timers like Hailey Hammer and Mindy Horr and others.

They seem untouchable … until they aren’t.

There are at least three CHS records, though, which have endured for at least five decades, which would seem to make them truly untouchable.

However, I would argue that only one mark from that trio is truly safe.

The first two come from basketball, where Jeff Stone torched the nets for the single-game (48 points) and single-season (644) scoring records in 1970.

Working without the three-point line, the Wolf senior led Coupeville to the state tourney for the first time in school history, one hard-earned bucket at a time.

Over the past 50 years, no one has come even remotely close to the season mark, with the second-best individual season belonging to Jeff Rhubottom in 1977-1978.

And he scored 459 points, almost 200(!) points shy of what Stone threw down.

But, I would argue, neither record is truly safe.

With the three-point explosion in full bloom, the single-game record is begging to be topped, and even the season mark (while much safer) isn’t untouchable.

Hawthorne Wolfe had back-to-back games of 34 and 33 points this winter as a sophomore, and he’s only going to get stronger, quicker, and more confident.

Paired with the explosive Xavier Murdy, who also has two seasons left, the duo are primed to go on a scoring bender.

Will they make history? We’ll see.

Wolf legends from Mike Bagby to Pete Petrov to Randy Keefe to current CHS coach Brad Sherman all made runs at Stone’s marks, but couldn’t get there.

But it’s not out of the realm of possibility.

Which brings us to the one record I will stand behind as truly untouchable.

In the spring of 1964, Bob Rea, then a CHS junior, rang up 27 strikeouts across 16 innings in a 2-1 win at Darrington.

Look at those numbers for a second, remember that the opposing pitcher, Brian Mount, also tossed 16 innings, and then go look at the modern-day pitch-count rules which govern Washington state baseball.

It’s the record which will never, ever, ever, fall.

The game was played on a dusty field made up entirely of sand and gravel.

Train tracks slashed through left field, and any ball hitting said tracks was “fair game … you got as many bases as you could touch.”

“I can still see Ray Harvey, our left fielder, looking both ways before he stepped out on the tracks to recover a well-hit ball,” Rea remembered during a 2016 interview.

With an arm made strong by hucking rocks at Snakelum Point, Rea never thought about coming out of the game that day. That’s how you played in 1964.

He would keep on throwing through four seasons of college ball, after missing his senior season at CHS with a broken leg.

Rea was also a top-flight quarterback and one of the more-proficient scorers in Wolf basketball history, but his time on the baseball diamond is what will live the longest in Coupeville lore.

So why do I think his record is the one CHS mark which is truly untouchable?

Because a modern-day pitcher would have to be nearly flawless, while getting no run support, to make a run at Rea’s mark.

High school games in Washington state are seven inning affairs, so even if a hurler struck out every single hitter he faced, he’d still need at least two extra innings to reach 27 K’s.

To break the record, that 28th whiff would come no earlier than the 10th inning (our third extra frame), and, long before then, our pitcher would run into the biggest roadblock.

In 1964, you could pitch until your arm fell off, if your coach let you. Then you could duct-tape your arm back on, and keep on flingin’ heat.

In 2020, WIAA guidelines limit hurlers to no more than 105 pitches in a single day.

Go one over that, and the offending coach is imprisoned for 20 to life in the gulag. Or something close.

With three strikes to a hitter, you’d need 84 strikes minimum to get to that 28th K, while getting a strike on at least 80% of your allotted pitches, and heaven forbid if you needed a 106th pitch to break the record.

All while your team didn’t score a single run.

And that’s the bare minimum needed.

Toss in any walks or hits or errors, and your pitcher’s margin of error to reach 28 K’s becomes about .0000000000009.

So, we go back to the basketball court, where a three-point marksman could get hot (really hot) and catch Stone’s 48-point night.

I’ve personally witnessed a Coupeville player hit as many as 10 three-balls in a JV game, and eight in a varsity tilt, so while 17 treys in a night isn’t likely, it’s not out of the realm of possibility.

But 28 strikeouts in one game under modern-day rules?

Never gonna happen. Like never, ever, ever.

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Hunter Smith, swooping to the hoop, is one of three players in CHS basketball history with his first name, joining Hunter Hammer and Hunter Downes. (Photos by JohnsPhotos.net)

There is only one Jacobi in 103 seasons, however, and it’s Jacobi Pilgrim.

There have been seven Jason’s in a CHS varsity uniform, but the one with Bagby as his last name still stands tall.

The history of the Coupeville High School boys basketball program is my great white whale.

It stretches out across 103 seasons, and, while a chunk of the records seem all but lost to the whims of time, I think we’ve done a pretty good job of documenting things.

As of this morning, I’ve recorded 74,587 points, tossed in to the bucket by 391 different varsity players.

Our inability to completely figure out career scoring totals for ’50s supernovas Jack Elzinga and Tom Sahli remains a thorn in my side.

And, while I have two seasons from the 1920’s locked down cold (Roy Armstrong was The Man), the ’30s will probably always be a mystery, unfortunately.

But, we go with what we have, while always hoping someone, someday, will unearth a treasure trove of scorebooks from the olden, golden days.

Today, following in the footsteps of Saturday’s story about CHS girls basketball scoring by first name, we’re doing the same quarantine-related stat-shuffling.

What do we find?

When you’re talking about 103 years, and changing popularity of names, it’s a wild mishmash.

We’ve got a Banky, a Gaylord, an Ulrik, a LaVerne, a Koa, and a couple of guys named … Guy.

Plus, a Caesar, an Utz, a Zepher, a Raleigh, an Ariah, and a Boom.

Also, as expected, a whole lot of John’s, Brian’s, Jason’s, and Scott’s.

Topping them all, however, is Mike, with no less than 11 guys with that name scoring for the Wolf hoops team over the years.

Bagby, Criscuola, Syreen, Millenbach, Mallo, Ankney, Ellsworth, Brown, Duke, Lester, and Eaton, working our way down the chart.

Or is it 12, if we count the one guy who went by Michael during his b-ball days, Michael Vaughan?

While the Coupeville girls program has five letters (F, O, Q, U, and X) which have never appeared at the start of a first name, part of that may be due to their much-briefer history.

With 103 seasons to just 46, the Wolf boys rep every letter except Y.

Y not, one asks?

Is no one brave enough to name their son after the hero in the 1982 sci-fi “classic” Yor, Hunter from the Future?

While we wait for that day, Xavier Murdy, Oscar Liquidano, and Quinten Farmer are the first, and so far, only ones, to stand tall for their opening initials.

As is Ian Smith, as in somewhat of a surprise to me, I is also one of the four letters with just one Wolf boy to call its own.

Maybe all the moms and dads just slid by I and landed on J, because, with 59 players, it routs the field.

R (42), D (38), and B (37) made decent runs, but it’s still a blowout.

Cause, it’s basketball, and when you need someone to drain a J, you turn to a J.

Simple as that.

 

How the letters rank, with total boys followed by total points:

A – 12/2771
B – 37/9045
C – 29/5867
D – 38/5583
E – 12/1356
F – 4/1142
G – 19/4658
H – 8/2848
I – 1/324
J – 59/11,236
K – 12/1738
L – 6/196
M – 32/6479
N – 9/1454
O – 1/1
P – 7/3169
Q – 1/75
R – 42/6560
S – 21/2930
T – 29/3850
U – 2/478
V – 2/877
W – 4/1476
X – 1/99
Y – zip
Z – 3/375

 

By first names:

Aaron (2) – 601
Alan (1) – 198
Alex (1) – 272
Allen (1) – 305
Andrew (3) – 295
Anthony (1) – 176
Ariah (1) – 5
Arik (1) – 867
Asa (1) – 52
Banky (1) – 44
Barry (1) – 769
Ben (5) – 914
Bill (5) – 1957
Blaine (1) – 393
Blake (1) – 299
Bob (2) – 321
Bobby (1) – 7
Boom (1) – 275
Brad (5) – 1978
Brandon (1) – 245
Brandy (1) – 58
Brian (8) – 1318
Bruce (1) – 9
Bryan (1) – 99
Bud (1) – 19
Byron (1) – 340
Caesar (1) – 369
Caleb (2) – 499
Cameron (1) – 80
Carson (1) – 86
Casey (2) – 654
Cedric (1) – 17
Chad (3) – 549
Charlie (3) – 371
Chris (6) – 1248
Christian (2) – 211
Chuck (2) – 42
CJ (1) – 54
Cody (1) – 518
Corey (1) – 811
Craig (1) – 132
Curt (1) – 226
Dale (2) – 357
Dalton (2) – 95
Dan (3) – 850
Dane (1) – 20
Daniel (3) – 42
Danny (1) – 36
Dante (1) – 34
Dave (4) – 91
David (3) – 885
Dean (2) – 88
DeAndre (1) – 56
Del (1) – 440
Dennis (1) – 57
Denny (3) – 1409
Desmond (1) – 11
Dick (1) – 352
DJ (1) – 13
Don (3) – 549
Doug (1) – 45
Drew (1) – 56
Duane (1) – 76
Dustin (1) – 21
Ed (2) – 225
Eddie (1) – 45
Ellis (1) – 56
Eric (3) – 392
Erick (1) – 40
Erik (2) – 69
Ethan (1) – 352
Evan (1) – 177
Foster (1) – 668
Frank (2) – 465
Fred (1) – 9
Gabe (2) – 908
Gary (3) – 984
Gavin (3) – 952
Gaylord (1) – 41
Geoff (2) – 381
George (2) – 148
Glen (1) – 12
Glenn (1) – 350
Greg (2) – 852
Guy (2) – 30
Harold (1) – 323
Harvey (1) – 265
Hawthorne (1) – 410
Henry (1) – 14
Hugh (1) – 145
Hunter (3) – 1691
Ian (1) – 324
Jack (1) – 646
Jacobi (1) – 111
James (3) – 511
Jared (1) – 24
Jason (7) – 1410
Jay (1) – 21
JD (2) – 378
Jean (1) – 17
Jeff (6) – 2300
Jered (1) – 156
Jeremy (2) – 64
Jerry (3) – 630
Jesse (1) – 119
Jim (6) – 1195
Jimmy (1) – 9
JJ (2) – 596
Joe (7) – 1153
Joel (1) – 217
Joey (1) – 121
John (7) – 1301
Jon (1) – 11
Jordan (2) – 230
Josh (1) – 16
Keith (2) – 319
Ken (1) – 11
Kevin (2) – 345
Kit (1) – 275
Koa (1) – 94
Kole (1) – 12
Kraig (1) – 8
Kramer (1) – 636
Kyle (2) – 38
Larry (1) – 26
LaVerne (1) – 12
Len (1) – 61
Les (1) – 69
Lewis (1) – 25
Luke (1) – 3
Marc (2) – 600
Marion (1) – 2
Mark (2) – 190
Martin (1) – 58
Marvin (2) – 68
Mason (1) – 414
Matt (7) – 605
Meryl (1) – 1
Michael (1) – 337
Mike (9) – 3639
Mitch (2) – 310
Monty (1) – 155
Morgan (2) – 100
Nate (1) – 5
Nevin (1) – 40
Nic (1) – 5
Nick (3) – 803
Noah (1) – 301
Noel (1) – 298
Norm (1) – 2
Oscar (1) – 1
Pat (5) – 2250
Paul (1) – 2
Pete (1) – 917
Quentin (1) – 75
Raleigh (1) – 1
Ralph (2) – 33
Randy (4) – 1869
Ray (2) – 397
Rich (3) – 856
Richard (4) – 514
Rick (4) – 321
Risen (1) – 291
Rob (2) – 26
Robbie (1) – 2
Robert (4) – 49
Robin (1) – 342
Roger (1) – 168
Ron (3) – 247
Ross (1) – 77
Roy (3) – 822
Rusty (1) – 3
Ryan (4) – 542
Sam (1) – 58
Sandy (1) – 118
Scott (7) – 504
Sean (3) – 960
Shawn (1) – 197
Sid (1) – 3
Stanley (1) – 48
Stephen (1) – 2
Steve (4) – 1024
Steven (1) – 16
Taylor (1) – 114
Ted (1) – 91
Teo (1) – 2
Terry (1) – 277
Tim (4) – 424
Timm (1) – 345
Toby (1) – 28
Todd (2) – 41
Tom (4) – 822
Tony (3) – 504
Tracy (1) – 3
Travis (1) – 10
Trent (1) – 23
Trevor (2) – 216
Troy (2) – 305
Tucker (1) – 6
Ty (1) – 369
Tyler (1) – 270
Ulrik (1) – 152
Utz (1) – 326
Vance (1) – 203
Virgil (1) – 674
Wade (1) – 659
Wayne (2) – 185
Wiley (1) – 632
Xavier (1) – 99
Zack (1) – 66
Zeb (1) – 35
Zepher (1) – 274

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Jeff Stone torched the nets for 644 points in the 1969-1970 season, the best single-season performance in Whidbey Island history. (Photos courtesy Stone)

Tim Quenzer slices ‘n dices the defense.

Pat O’Grady lofts a sweet jumper.

Bob Barker (left), the coach of the 69-70 squad, reunites with Stone during the 101st anniversary of CHS hoops in 2018. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

History waits for no man.

A week from today marks the 50th anniversary of arguably the biggest moment in the 100+ year run of Coupeville High School sports.

On March 4, 1970, the Wolf boys basketball team, coached by Bob Barker, stepped on to the floor to face Ritzville in the state basketball tourney.

It was the first time a CHS team had made it to the big dance in any sport, and that game, and another the next day against Kittitas, signaled the arrival of Coupeville on the main stage.

The 1969-1970 Wolf boys hoops team is still the standard-bearer for the program, five decades later.

Even with the addition of the three-point shot and other wrinkles tossed in to the game to fire up offenses, no one has touched the numbers rung up by that squad.

Jeff Stone rattled the rims for 644 points across 24 games, including a school-record 48 in a district title win against Darrington, while the Wolves as a team dropped in 1,836 points, breaking 100 four times.

All of those numbers, and the 114 scored in a win against Watson-Groen, still stand as the best in CHS history 50 years later.

While Coupeville fell in close games in both state bouts, it finished 20-4 and remains a revered team, not only for its scoring prowess, but for its landmark achievements.

When the Wolves beat Darrington 84-62, they became the first Whidbey Island basketball team to win a district title, beating out Oak Harbor and South Whidbey/Langley in the chase for immortality.

Stone’s 48-point explosion, which came on 17-28 shooting from the floor and 14-16 from the free-throw line, has never been seriously challenged.

And his numbers could have been bigger, as Barker pulled his 6-foot-4 tower of power with a full 90 seconds left to play.

Stone’s scoring, and his team’s season of success, were big in the moment.

Fifty years later, they’re even bigger.

 

The 1969-1970 CHS boys basketball team:

Bob Barker (Head Coach)
Craig Pedlar
(Assistant Coach)

Pat Brown
Corey Cross
Marvin Darst
Tim Leese
Ralph Lindsay
Glenn Losey
Mike Mallo
Pat O’Grady
Tim Quenzer
Jeff Stone
Randy Stone
Jim Syreen

Bob Mueller (Manager)
Geoff Stone (Manager)

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Departing senior Jered Brown tallied 156 points in his prep career, while setting up numerous teammates with his pass-first playing style. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

It is the holy grail of Coupeville Sports.

A project which never ends, and is both rewarding and infuriating.

Tracking career individual scoring stats for the CHS varsity basketball programs requires a fair amount of sleuthing, some bleary eyes, and more than a little luck.

And then it’ll never really be complete…

Especially on the boys side of things.

No matter how many old newspapers I gingerly leaf through, no matter how many scorebooks I track down, a century-plus of Wolf basketball is a long time, and some records are simply lost to time.

I would love to find a scorebook for the 1953-1954 team, stashed in someone’s attic or barn.

But I know it’s unlikely, and so Jack Elzinga, Tom Sahli, and Jerry Zylstra’s scoring stats will never be truly complete.

But, I keep looking, and keep hoping, and compile what I have.

It ain’t perfect, but it’s better than what anyone else out there has managed to pull together.

So, having reached the end of the 103rd season of CHS boys basketball, I present my version of a career scoring chart for the program, updated to include every last point scored during the 2019-2020 season.

As you ramble through the list below, it includes 392 Wolves, three of whom — Hawthorne Wolfe, Xavier Murdy, and Daniel Olson — are still active.

With Coupeville sending off 11 seniors, most of next year’s varsity will be first-timers, making it likely the program will see its 400th scorer.

Of course, maybe someone unearths a bunch of scorebooks from the ’20s and ’30s in a basement, and we’ll reach 400 long before then.

You know, dream the impossible dream.

 

As you go through the list, where there are ties, it goes in alphabetic order, with one exception.

Jeff Stone and Mike Bagby both scored 1,137 points during their prep careers, tying for #1 all-time among Wolf boys.

I slot Stone first, even though B comes before S, as he accomplished the feat in three seasons to Bagby’s four, as Coupeville freshmen weren’t eligible to play high school hoops in the late ’60s/early ’70s.

 

CHS boys basketball career scoring chart (1917-2020):

Jeff Stone – 1137
Mike Bagby – 1137
Randy Keefe – 1088
Jeff Rhubottom – 1012
Mike Criscuola – 979 (**Missing stats**)
Bill Riley – 934
Pete Petrov – 917
Brad Sherman – 874
Denny Clark – 869
Arik Garthwaite – 867

Bill Jarrell – 855
Hunter Smith – 847
Corey Cross – 811
Barry Brown – 769
Hunter Hammer – 755
Steve Whitney – 730
Dan Nieder – 729
Chris Good – 688
Gavin Keohane – 677
Virgil Roehl – 674

Foster Faris – 668
Pat Bennett – 659
Wade Ellsworth – 659
Jason McFadyen – 654
Jack Elzinga – 646 (**Missing stats**)
Rich Morris – 637
Kramer O’Keefe – 636
Wiley Hesselgrave – 632
John O’Grady – 611
Greg White – 604

Joe Whitney – 601
Brian Miller – 597
Mike Syreen – 594
Gabe McMurray – 592
Pat Clark – 583
Randy Duggan – 552
Roy Marti – 551
Jim Syreen – 550
Marc Bissett – 549
Denny Zylstra – 538

Brad Miller – 526
Gary Faris – 524
JJ Marti – 520
Cody Peters – 518
David Lortz – 502
Jason Bagby – 499
Pat O’Grady – 472
Sean Dillon – 469
Frank Marti – 462
Gary Hammons – 443

Del O’Shell – 440
Tony Ford – 432
Caleb Powell – 421
Mason Grove – 414
Hawthorne Wolfe – 410 (**Active**)
Ben Biskovich – 407
Casey Clark – 407
Nick Sellgren – 406
Jerry Zylstra – 405 (**Missing stats**)
Blaine Ghormley – 393

Tom Logan – 385
James Smith – 382
Chad Gale – 373
Mike Millenbach – 373
JD Wilcox – 373
Ty Blouin – 369
Caesar Kortuem – 369
Ray Harvey – 368
Pat Brown – 355
Dick Smith – 352

Ethan Spark – 352
Glenn Losey – 350
Timm Orsborn – 345
Robin Larson – 342
Byron Fellstrom – 340
Kevin Faris – 339
Michael Vaughan – 337
Jim Yake – 331
Aaron Trumbull – 330
Brad Brown – 328

Charlie Tessaro – 328
Utz Conard – 326
Ian Smith – 324
Harold Buckner – 323
David Ford – 323
Bob Rea – 320
Chris Marti – 319
Gabe Wynn – 316
Nick Streubel – 314
Tom Sahli – 310 (**Missing stats**)

Ben Hayes – 306
Allen Black – 305
Noah Roehl – 301
Blake Day – 299
Noel Criscuola – 298
John Beasley – 293
Risen Johnson – 291
Brian Fakkema – 290
Matt Frost – 290
Mike Mallo – 282

Keith Jameson – 277
Terry Roberts – 277
Kit Manzanares – 275
Boom Phomvongkoth – 275
Zepher Loesch – 274
Alex Evans – 272
Aaron Curtin – 271
Tyler King – 270
Joe Tessaro – 270
Eric Hopkins – 265

Harvey Wainio – 265
Rick Keefe – 259
Troy Blouin – 256
Sean Callahan – 256
Greg Fellstrom – 248
Casey Larson – 247
Don Schreiber – 247
Brandon Huff – 245
Richard Hammons – 240
Brad Haslam – 235

Sean Toomey-Stout – 235
Don Cook – 230
Geoff Hageman – 227
Curt Youderian – 226
Ed Wood – 219
Rich Vaughan – 217
Joel Walstad – 217
Richard Cook – 216
Ryan Keefe – 214
Jordan Ford – 210

Andrew Mouw – 204
Vance Huffman – 203
Tim Quenzer – 202
Alan Hancock – 198
Shawn Ryan – 197
Mitch Aparicio – 195
Trevor Tucker – 194
Roy Mattox – 191
Dale Sherman – 188
Scott Stuurmans – 188

Pat Millenbach – 181
Wayne Hardie – 178
Chris Cox – 177
Evan Tingstad – 177
Jerry VandWerfhorst – 177
Anthony Bergeron – 176
Mike Ankney – 173
John Engstrom – 173
Ron Naddy – 172
Dale Libbey – 169

Roger Sherman – 168
Tim Walstad – 168
Randy Blindauer – 166
Mark Bepler – 165
Chad Brookhouse – 163
Jered Brown – 156
Monty Moore – 155
Geoff Wacker – 154
Bill Baas – 153
Ulrik Wells – 152

Jim Faris – 151
Steve Konek – 149
Gavin O’Keefe – 149
Ryan McManigle – 148
Ryan Griggs – 147
Hugh Abell – 145
George Libbey – 142
Noel Criscuola – 136
Craig Anderson – 132
Scott Franzen – 129

Ben Etzell – 127
Gavin Knoblich – 126
Brian Shank – 125
Joey Lippo – 121
Jessie Smith – 119
Sandy Roberts – 118
Scott McGraw – 116
Christian Townsdin – 116
Mitch Pelroy – 115
Taylor Ebersole – 114

Eric Taylor – 112
Jim Casey – 111
Jacobi Pilgrim – 111
Brian Barr – 108
Joe Donellon – 101
Jason McManigle – 101
Bryan Hamilton – 99
Xavier Murdy – 99 (**Active**)
Brian Knoll – 98
Morgan Payne – 96

Christian Lyness – 95
Koa Davison – 94
Ted Weber – 91
Hunter Downes – 89
James Meek – 89
Dan Miller – 89
Steve Bissett – 87
Andrew Cashen – 87
Carson Risner – 86
John Sinema – 86

Nick Morris – 83
Roy Armstrong – 80
Cameron Toomey-Stout – 80
Caleb Valko – 78
Ross Buckner – 77
Matt Shank – 77
JJ Johnson – 76
Duane Score – 76
Quinten Farmer – 75
Matt Ortega – 75

Mike Ellsworth – 74
Don Spangler – 72
John Zimmerman – 72
Joe Bruzas – 71
Jason Fisher – 71
Tony Prosser – 70
Les Jacobson – 69
Tom Conard – 68
Dean Grasser – 68
Matt Bepler – 67

Zack Swerdfeger – 66
Ron Lanphere – 65
Ben Hancock – 63
Randy Stone – 63
Mike Brown – 62
Jason McDavid – 62
Jeremy Staples – 62
Len Buckner – 61
Brian Hageman – 61
Erik King – 61

David Davis – 60
Tom Mueller – 59
Brandy Ambrose – 58
Sam Kieth – 58
Steve Smith – 58
Martin Walsh – 58
Matt Helm – 57
Dennis Terrell – 57
Drew Chan – 56
DeAndre Mitchell – 56

Ellis Schultz – 56
CJ Smith – 54
Asa Owensby – 52
Marc Aparicio – 51
Chris Chan – 51
Joe Kelley – 51
Marvin Darst – 50
Troy Hurlburt – 49
Stanley Bruzas – 48
Dalton Engle – 48

Jerry Helm – 48
Dalton Martin – 47
Eddie Fasolo – 45
Doug Speers – 45
Banky Fisher – 44
Keith Dunnagan – 42
Dave Stoddard – 42
Gaylord Stidham – 41
Erick Harada – 40
James Jorgensen – 40

Nevin Miranda – 40
Jeff Thomas – 40
John Wyatt – 40
Danny Bonacci – 36
Chuck Ruthford – 36
Charlie Toth – 36
Jim Marti – 35
Zeb Williams – 35
Robert Cushen – 34
Dante Mitchell – 34

Dave Brandt – 33
Ryan Kelley – 33
Brian Roundy – 32
Richard Barber – 31
Joe Libbey – 31
Ray Cook – 29
Tim Leese – 29
Ralph Lindsay – 29
Kyle Rockwell – 29
Rick Marti – 28

Toby Martinez – 28
Daniel McDonald – 28
Joe Rojas – 28
Todd Smith – 28
Scott Sollars – 28
Richard Benson – 27
Mike Duke – 27
John Holmes – 26
Larry Zylstra – 26
Lewis Berry – 25

Mark Short – 25
Tim Youderian – 25
Jared Helmstadter – 24
Trent Diamanti – 23
John Moskeland – 22
Trevor Mueller – 22
Dan Schleiffers – 22
Jay Roberts – 21
Dustin Van Velkinburgh – 21
Matt Douglas – 20

Jordan Emerson – 20
Dane Lucero – 20
Dean Strom – 20
Scott Fisher – 19
Scott Losey – 19
Bud Merryman – 19
Matt Petrich – 19
Jason Raymond – 19
Rob Blouin – 18
Rick Keith – 18

Marvin Mitchell – 18
Guy Walker – 18
Gary Boyke – 17
Jim Keith – 17
Jean Lund-Olsen – 17
Cedric McIntosh – 17
Rick Frieze – 16
Chad Nixon – 16
Josh Wilsey – 16
Steven Cope – 15

Eric Dyer – 15
Mike Lester – 15
Brad Rogers – 15
Henry Edwards – 14
Todd Brown – 13
DJ Kim – 13
LaVerne Arnold – 12
Mike Eaton – 12
Guy George – 12
Kole Kellison – 12

Glen Lanphere – 12
Desmond Bell – 11
Bill Hamilton – 11
Ken Pickard – 11
Jon Roberts – 11
Chris Squires – 11
Ben Winkes – 11
Ron Edwards – 10
Travis Hooker – 10
Daniel Graham – 9

Kyle King – 9
Bruce Seiger – 9
Jimmy Sullivan – 9
Fred Wyatt – 9
Erik Anderson – 8
Dave Bowers – 8
Rob Fasolo – 8
Kraig Gordon – 8
Robert Shafer – 8
Dave Wells – 8

Charlie Cook – 7
Bobby Engle – 7
Brian Folkestad – 7
Wayne Hesselgrave – 7
Ed Cook – 6
Tucker Hall – 6
Chuck Hardee – 6
Kevin King – 6
Robert Kirkwood – 6
George Smith – 6

Nic Anthony – 5
Ariah Bepler – 5
Scott Davidson – 5
JD Myers – 5
Daniel Olson – 5 (**Active**)
Nate Steele – 5
Andrew Bird – 4
Bill Boze – 4
Ralph Engle – 4
Jason Legat – 4

Morgan Roehl – 4
Rusty Bailey – 3
Luke Currier – 3
Sid Mudgett – 3
Frank Mueller – 3
Tracy Wilson – 3
Teo Benson – 2
Norm Enders – 2
Chris Locke – 2
Jeremy McCormick – 2

Rich McCormick – 2
Denny Moss – 2
Tony Sherman – 2
Marion Sill – 2
Stephen Stietenroth – 2
Robbie Wanamaker – 2
Paul Baher – 1
Robert Engle – 1
Bob Franzen – 1
Meryl Gordon – 1

Oscar Liquidano – 1
Raleigh Sherman – 1

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