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   Jeff Rhubottom (top, left) is joined by (clockwise from top right) Bill Jarrell, Randy Keefe and Terry (Perkins) Powell (wearing blue necklace).

Better late than never.

As I’ve constructed the one-man, semi-real shrine to excellence known as the Coupeville Sports Hall o’ Fame, I’ve zigged and I’ve zagged, plucking excellence from all decades.

And yet, I would be the first to admit, my decision-making process has always been at least slightly suspect.

Some people got in really early, and sometimes, for a thousand different reasons, some of the most qualified have been left to bide their time outside the doors of our digital hall.

Almost always it wasn’t intentional. I promise.

Today, we’re making up for that, at least a little, with the induction of four of the most talented Wolves to ever put a basketball into the bucket.

They all played multiple sports, and were standouts regardless of the season, but, with my recent deep dive into the CHS basketball records — which exist in a million little pieces — this fab four looms even larger.

So, way, way, WAAAAAAAYYYYYYYY overdue, let’s welcome Randy Keefe, Terry (Perkins) Powell, Bill Jarrell and Jeff Rhubottom to the Hall o’ Fame.

After this, you’ll find them up at the top of the blog, under the Legends tab, which is something they’ve always been, even if this writer has taken forever to get them enshrined.

Our first inductee, Powell, stands as one of the first true girls basketball stars in Central Whidbey history.

She led the Wolves in scoring for three consecutive seasons, tossing in 194 points in 1984-1985, 165 in the ’85-’86 campaign, then topping things off with a 314-point barrage in ’86-’87.

Working in tandem with fellow Hall o’ Famer Marlene Grasser (who netted 307 points that year), Powell was the leader of the first CHS girls hoops team to advance to the playoffs.

At the time of her graduation, Powell held the school single-season and career scoring marks for girls.

The increased pace of the game and addition of the three-point shot allowed a handful of other Wolves to eventually catch and pass her, but she remains #7 in career scoring with 673 points.

Her fellow inductees dominated in the ’70s, and the fact all three remain in the top 10 with both career and single-season scoring marks, is made more remarkable by two facts.

One, they all played before everyone and their brother got three points for hitting a shot behind the arc, and two, they suited up at a time when ninth graders either didn’t play high school basketball or were firmly affixed to the very end of the bench by their coaches.

That didn’t stop any of the three, though.

Keefe and Jarrell’s high school hoops careers ran from the ’73-’74 season (their sophomore campaign) through a journey to the state tourney in ’75-’76 as seniors.

One was maybe the most consistent scorer in school history, while the other caught his buddy at the end with a season for the ages.

CHS boys basketball has played 100 seasons (1917-2017), and Keefe owns two of the 10 best single season performances.

He rattled home 293 points as a sophomore, 398 as a junior (#7 all-time) and 397 as a senior (#8 all-time), leaving him with 1,088 points, third-best in program history.

Only two guys beat him, Jeff Stone (1137) and Mike Bagby (1104), and Stone had to throw down an Island-record 644 points as a senior to assure that, while Bagby, playing in the modern era, got a full four years as a varsity starter.

Jarrell didn’t come out of the gate quite as quickly as his running mate, settling for 83 points as a sophomore, fifth-best on that year’s team.

Then, something clicked and he went off for 357 points as a junior and 415 as a senior.

Snapping Keefe’s two-year run as team scoring champ, Jarrell’s senior heroics stand as the fifth-best single-season performance, and his 855 points lands him at #10 on the career list.

That ’75-’76 squad was one of the best the school ever had, and, along with the hot-shooting senior duo of Keefe and Jarrell, the Wolves got a huge contribution from a rampaging 6-foot-4 sophomore named Rhubottom.

He pounded away for 228 points as a sophomore, then took on even more of the scoring load over the next two seasons.

Rhubottom knocked down 325 as a junior (backing up Foster Faris, who went off for 348), then unleashed a beat-down as a senior.

By the time he was finished with the ’77-’78 season, Rhubottom had 459 points, which remains the second-best single season in school history, boys or girls, trailing just Stone’s once-in-a-century performance.

His 1012 career points will have him sitting #4 on that list when CHS raises a basketball record board.

Now, of course, we haven’t talked about the hundreds upon hundreds of rebounds hauled down, the assists doled out, the steals made off, or all the small plays this four-pack made.

But, even just talking about their scoring ability, it’s easy to see why Powell, Keefe, Jarrell and Rhubottom remain among the biggest stars to ever grace the CHS hardwood.

Hall o’ Famers, one and all, even if they had to wait way too long for it to be “official.”

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Jeff and Cindy Rhubottom. (Contributed photos)

   A flashback to the days when Rhubottom terrorized Wolf rivals on the hardwood.

   The socks were extraordinary, and so was their ability to put the ball in the hoop.

“Respect yourself. Respect your school.”

Jeff Rhubottom was one of the best athletes to ever walk the hallways of Coupeville High School, and he lived by that credo.

A 6-foot-4 tower of power, the 1978 Wolf grad was a 12-time letter winner (four times each in football, basketball and track and field), a two-time All-Conference hoops player and the school record holder in the high jump for more than a decade.

While fellow football player Rich Wilson (6-4) nipped Rhubottom’s mark (6-2) in 2000 — and retains the school record 17 years later — Rhubottom’s legacy still looms large.

He torched the basketball nets for 459 points his senior season in 1977-1978, the second-best single-season mark ever put up a Wolf, boy or girl.

Over the course of four seasons, while sharing the ball with some of the biggest scorers and sweetest shooters in CHS hoops history, he finished with 1,012 points.

In 100 seasons of Wolf boys basketball, only Jeff Stone (1137), Mike Bagby (1104) and Rhubottom contemporary Randy Keefe (1088) have topped that.

While he enjoyed his other sports (he was a tight end/outside linebacker in football and a sprinter, relay runner and state meet-qualifying high jumper on the track oval), basketball was always Rhubottom’s favorite.

“Making the starting five on the varsity squad in basketball my sophomore year” was a particular highlight, which allowed him to “play with great athletes like Bill Jarrell, Randy Keefe, Marc Bisset and Foster Faris.”

That unit played for legendary CHS coach Bob Barker, a man who had a huge positive impact on Rhubottom.

“Coach Barker (was a favorite) for his professionalism,” Rhubottom said. “I remember him quoting as he was handing out our red blazers, ‘You’re representing yourself as an athlete and you’re representing Coupeville High School’.”

CHS football coach Pat Lippincott and track guru Craig Pedlar (“great teacher, great coach”) also helped shaped the young Rhubottom into the man he became.

“Coach Pedlar brought Michael Ellsworth, Jeff Fielding, and myself to the State A Finals in Yakima in 1978,” Rhubottom said. “It was great to be involved with great athletes of the school.

“It’s what you did on Friday nights.”

Whether it was standing tall at the state tourney or ripping through the line to block a punt against Concrete, before scooping up the loose ball and taking it to the house for a touchdown, Rhubottom played with passion, for himself and his teammates.

“I loved and respected the athletic program, playing with great athletes in a small town.”

The lessons he learned as a Wolf benefited Rhubottom as he went on to build his own family (he has a son, Jeff, Jr.) and a career in the painting business.

“Working hard and being responsible and trying to stay in the best physical shape as the years go by. Keeping active,” have been his guiding principals.

Rhubottom considers himself “totally blessed,” having been married to Cindy, “the most beautiful, loving wife, mother, and grandmother” until she lost her battle with cancer in September, 2016.

Being “surrounded by loving new and old family” has helped him greatly.

As he looks back at his own career, Rhubottom calls on today’s Wolves to seize the day.

“Respect yourself. Respect your school. Give 110%. Enjoy the experience,” he said. “Have fun, because it goes by quick.

“Keep active. Always love the sport,” Rhubottom added. “It was fun to take a trip down memory road of my athletic career at Coupeville High School. These are memories I will cherish forever.”

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   Hunter Smith singed the nets for 332 points last season, the best performance by a Wolf boy since 2009. (John Fisken photo)

300 is a magical number.

You win 300 games as a Major League Baseball pitcher, you’re almost certain to be bound for Cooperstown.

Roll a 300 on the bowling lanes, and you are el perfecto.

And how many Spartans did Leonides need to hold the line against Xerxes? Yep, you’re getting it.

When we turn to high school basketball, 300 holds up. Score that many points in a season, which usually ranges from 20-27 games, and you had a great year.

While 400 points in a season is truly rarefied air, and 200 still very solid, 300 sits as a nice way to mark the gold standard, so that’s what we’re doing today.

Look at the history of Coupeville High School (100 years of boys teams and 43 of girls) and 300 points in a season has been achieved 56 times, by 41 athletes.

Boys hold the edge (42-14 in seasons and 32-9 in players), though Brianne King is the only CHS hoops star to achieve the feat three times.

While 13 other players (10 boys, three girls) have two 300-point seasons, King is also the lone Wolf to crack 400 points in a single campaign twice.

Some other facts to sprinkle into your next halftime conversation:

Twice, three Wolf boys have topped the mark during the same season.

1975-176 gave us Bill Jarrell (415), Randy Keefe (397) and Marc Bissett (302) while ’78-’79 featured Wade Ellsworth (392), Roy Marti (342) and Steve Whitney (337).

And yet, neither one of those CHS squads holds the single-season team scoring mark, which belongs to the ’69-’70 team led by Jeff Stone’s single-season record 644 points.

Those Wolves, the first Whidbey hoops team to win a district title, had five guys hit 200+ points (though only Stone cracked 300) en route to pouring in 1,815 points in 24 games.

On the girls side of the ball, there has been three times when a duo netted 300+ in the same year, with one of those times coming dangerously close to hitting the trifecta.

The ’86-’87 squad, the first girls team to make the playoffs, got 314 from Terry Perkins, 307 from Marlene Grasser and (just missing) 274 from Tina Barker.

Zenovia Barron and Ann Pettit also torched the nets together in back-to-back years, first in ’96-’97 (Novi 378, Ann 317) and ’97-’98 (Novi 376, Ann 363).

And while 300 is the magic mark, you have to give a brief shout-out to Tina Lyness (’99-’00) and Megan Smith (’09-’10), who came up one slim point short, each tallying 299 in a season.

Though, don’t feel too bad for Smith, who is on our list for a different season.

Also earning “close but no cigar” status are Pat O’Grady (296 in ’69-’70) and Lexie Black (295 in ’04-05).

But, we’re here to hail those who did achieve 300-point nirvana, the scorers and the dreamers, the best single-season performers in CHS hoops history:

(644) Jeff Stone ’69-’70
(459) Jeff Rhubottom ’77-’78
(446) Brianne King ’00-’01
(442) Brianne King ’02-’03
(442) Pete Petrov ’95-’96
(427) Makana Stone ’15-’16
(423) Arik Garthwaite ’97-’98
(415) Bill Jarrell ’75-’76
(414) Mike Bagby ’04-’05
(398) Randy Keefe ’74-’75
(397) Randy Keefe ’75-’76
(396) Brad Sherman ’02-’03
(392) Wade Ellsworth ’78-’79
(391) Del O’Shell ’81-’82
(388) Bill Riley ’72-’73
(388) Joe Whitney ’79-’80
(386) Brianne King ’01-’02
(386) Bill Riley ’71-’72
(380) Cody Peters ’08-’09
(378) Zenovia Barron ’96-’97
(376) Zenovia Barron ’97-’98
(374) Gavin Keohane ’97-’98
(367) Makana Stone ’14-’15
(365) Denny Clark ’63-’64
(364) Mike Bagby ’05-’06
(363) Ann Pettit ’97-’98
(357) Bill Jarrell ’74-’75
(355) Gabe McMurray ’94-’95
(348) Foster Faris ’76-’77
(345) Timm Orsborn ’87-’88
(342) Roy Marti ’78-’79
(341) Virgil Roehl ’92-’93
(340) Pat Bennett ’99-’00
(337) Steve Whitney ’78-’79
(333) Corey Cross ’70-’71
(332) Hunter Smith ’16-’17
(331) Amanda Allmer ’94-’95
(328) Rich Morris ’95-’96
(327) Megan Smith ’08-’09
(325) Jeff Rhubottom ’76-’77
(319) Denny Clark ’62-’63
(319) Randy Duggan ’71-’72
(319) Chris Good ’01-’02
(317) Ann Pettit ’96-’97
(317) Jeff Stone ’68-’69
(314) Terry Perkins ’86-’87
(313) Dan Nieder ’87-’88
(312) Judy Marti ’83-’84
(310) Tom Sahli ’52-’53
(309) Rich Morris ’96-’97
(307) Marlene Grasser ’86-’87
(305) Allen Black ’03-’04
(305) Chris Good ’00-’01
(302) Marc Bissett ’75-’76
(302) Hunter Hammer ’09-’10
(300) Gavin Keohane ’98-’99

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   Brianne King (in pink) is joined by (clockwise from top right) Novi Barron, Makana Stone, Megan Smith, Ann Pettit, Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby, Terry Perkins, Lexie Black, Kristan Hurlburt and Tina Lyness.

It’s an exclusive club.

212 women, all united by one thing — they scored in a varsity basketball game while wearing a Coupeville High School uniform.

The list stretches from the second season of modern-day, post Title IX, girls hoops at CHS (1975-1976) until today.

Why does it not include the first season, you ask?

Because the Whidbey News-Times chose to ignore the ’74-’75 team completely and while I did obtain two photos and a roster from a former player, so far no stats have surfaced from that inaugural season.

So, with apologies to the first Wolves, we’re working with what we have.

But, if you are holding any stats from ’74-’75, send them my way and I’ll happily update this story.

Until then, with the caveat that there is no way to be 100% correct short of 43 years of perfectly-inscribed score-books suddenly surfacing (ha!), I give you the history of CHS girls hoops, told one bucket at a time.

Are there some baskets missing here and there? Absolutely.

I know for a fact I’m still missing 2-3 games from three different seasons (2003-2004, 2005-2006 and 2006-2007), though I’m close to tracking those down.

While those stats will tweak a couple of player’s point totals, there aren’t enough points still hidden in the mists of time to change the top 10, though.

Having scoured newspaper archives, tracked down what score-books are available and spent countless hours harassing those who played and coached, I can say, “This is 96.2, maybe 97.4% correct” with some confidence.

So, there’s that.

And, before you ask, we’re using maiden names, because those are the names players had when they torched the nets.

It’s a list which ranges from one-season wonders like Amanda Allmer and Sarah Mouw, who transferred in for their senior seasons, to young women who plugged away as role players year after year, getting a few points here and there.

There are seven active players on the list, with junior-to-be Lindsey Roberts (#77) slightly edging out senior-to-be Mikayla Elfrank (#79) as the top returning player.

The real target for Roberts, though? Mom Sherry, who sits a mere 28 points ahead of her at #64.

Topple the woman who brought her into the world and Lindsey will own family bragging rights, having already outpaced dad Jon Roberts, uncle Jay Roberts and aunt Jennifer (Eelkema) Roberts.

And that’s what lists like this are for — a way to remember the past, offer a target for the future and start (or finish) endless arguments at Thanksgiving.

You’re welcome.

CHS girls varsity basketball scorers (1975-2017) — * indicates active player:

Brianne King 1549
Zenovia Barron 1270
Makana Stone 1158
Megan Smith 1042
Ann Pettit 932
Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby 892
Terry Perkins 673
Lexie Black 622
Kristan Hurlburt
598
Tina Lyness
594
Marlene Grasser
574
Judy Marti
545
Brittany Black
502
Jen Canfield
497
Erica Lamb
497
Emily Vracin
467
Tina Barker
464
Vanessa Davis
448
Maureen Wetmore
438
Sarah Powell
425
Mika Hosek
424
Cassidi Rosenkrance
423
Ashley Manker
404
Shawna West
388
Katie Smith
374
Whitney Clark
359
Amy Mouw
353
Tracy Taylor
350
Kailey Kellner
339
Amanda Allmer
331
Misty Sellgren
331
Taniel Lamb
330
Marie Grasser
321
Mia Littlejohn
317
Amanda Fabrizi
299
Bessie Walstad
288
Hailey Hammer
282
Madeline Strasburg
261
Carly Guillory
260
Sarah Mouw
259
Julie Wieringa
252
Danette Beckley
249
Marlys West
247
Kendra O’Keefe
244
Breeanna Messner
235
Hilary Kortuem
231
Annette Jameson
223
Beth Mouw
216
Lisa Roehl
216
Linda Cheshier
210
Pam Jampsa
202
Julia Myers
202
Kim Warder
193
Kacie Kiel
188
Stephanie Clapp
185
Kassie Lawson
184
Heather Davis
182
Jaime Rasmussen
181
Trudy Eaton
180
Heidi Bepler
179
Jodi Christensen
174
Aimee Messner
168
Danielle Vracin
167
Sherry Bonacci
165
Marie Hesselgrave
165
Marilyn Brown
164
Hayley Ebersole
163
Yashmeen Knox
163
Traci Perkins
161
Suzette Glover
159
Jai’Lysa Hoskins
151
Jennifer Bailey
150
Emily Young
149
Vanessa Bodley
146
Joli Smith
142
Jennie Cross
140
Lindsey Roberts
137 (*)
Taya Boonstra
132
Mikayla Elfrank
128 (*)
Sarah Burgoyne
126
Christi Messner
125
Kayla Lawson
124
Cheryl Dunn
119
Jill Whitney
116
Laurie Estes
114
Debbie Snyder
113
Tiffany Briscoe
111
Lauren Escalle
109
Sally Biskovich
108
Kara Harvey
108
Kelly Snyder
104
Sue Wyatt
100
Lupine Wutzke
98
Monica Vidoni
97
Christine Barr
95
Lauren Grove
95
Babette Owensby
93
Toni Thiefault
92
Jennifer Pettit
85
Laura Young
83
Marnie Bartelson
81
Cheryl Pangburn
79
Courtney Arnold
78
Tonnalea Rasmussen
78
Sharon Jolly
75
Amanda Manker
73
Beth Cavanaugh
72
Kalia Littlejohn
68 (*)
Wynter Thorne
68
Rachelle Solomon
64
Lindsey Sherwood
61
Ann Kahler
60
Chelsea Rosenkrance
59
Judy Wallace
58
Rose Marti
57
Jean Wyatt
57
Jennifer Eelkema
55
Christine Larson
53
Courtney Boyd 52
Kari Johnson
52
Erin Ryan
52
Nicole Shelly
50
Traci Barker
49
Paige Mueller
49
Stephanie Kipp
48
Lynn Wilson
47
Andilee Murphy
46
Janiece Jenkins
43
Mehgan Metlow
43
Jessy Caselden
41
Karen Jampsa
40
Jennifer Meyer
40
Jill Keeney
39
Suzanne Enders
38
Mandi Murdy
37
Shawn Diem
35
Min Powell
35
Lauren Rose
32 (*)
Tammie Hardie
31
Shannon Rutledge
29
Taylor Sherman
29
Anna Myhr
28
Kirsty Croghan
27
Lori Friswold
27
Sarah Vass
27
Kyla Briscoe
26 (*)
Tina Jansen
26
Kim Stuurmans
26
Kathy Jolly
25
Shelby Kulz
25
Melissa Cox
23
Haley Marx
23
Lori Hart
21
Courtney Williams
21
Aleshia McFadyen
20
Nancy Dyer
18
Dina Lanphere
18
McKenzie Bailey
17
Carol Estes
17
Kristina Clark
16
Allison Wenzel
16 (*)
Sarah Wright
16 (*)
Dawn Clampet
15
Lindsey Tucker
13
Jeannette Fixel
12
Tammy Shubat
12
Nikki Snyder
12
Kelly Ankney
11
Naomi Prater
11
Michelle Riddle
11
Emily Wodjenski
11
Alyssa Kelley
10
Zarah Leaman
10
Toni Hudson
9
Georgie Smith
9
Cindy Bennett
8
Susan Estes
8
Ami Garthwaite
8
Eileen Hanley
8
Keri Iverson
8
Kristine Macnab
8
Michelle Smith
8
Carlie Rosenkrance
7
McKayla Bailey
6
Lexi Boyer
6
Rhiannon Ellsworth
6
Debbie Johnson
6
Grace LaPoint
6
Skyler Lawrence
6
Corrin Skvarla
6
Janie Wilson
6
Katy Bennett
5
Penny Griggs
5
Marissa Slater
5
Denise McGregor
4
Jessica Sherwood
4
Kara Warder
4
Christina Mowery
3
Samantha Roehl
3
Jamie Townsdin
3
Brenda Belcher
2
Rusty Brian
2
Carol Davis
2
Lisa Davis
2
Nicole Fuller
2
Cathy Higgins
2
Daisy Kent
2
Katie Kiel
2
Charlotte Langille
2
Tracy Barber 1
Amy Biskovich
1
Corinne Gaddis
1

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   Coupeville High School girls hoops tipped off in 1974. (Photos courtesy Martha Folsom)

The ’74-’75 squad, which had to go to Fort Casey to practice.

   The high scoring ’86-’87 Wolves, the first CHS girls hoops team to make the playoffs. (Photo courtesy Sherry Roberts)

They were the pioneers.

Today, 43 seasons into its existence, the Coupeville High School girls basketball program is flying high.

The current Wolves have won three straight Olympic League titles (while going 27-0 against conference rivals), and the program has produced numerous big-time stars and hung several state tourney banners over the years.

But all of that success had to start somewhere, and today we’re here to honor two squads which made everything possible.

As we swing open the doors to the Coupeville Sports Hall o’ Fame, we welcome the 1974-1975 and 1986-1987 Wolf girls hoops teams.

After this, you’ll find them hanging out up at the top of the blog, under the Legends tab.

Why those teams?

Because the ’74-’75 squad was the first modern-day team in school history and the ’86-’87 sharpshooters were the first to ever make the playoffs.

With Title IX having shaken things up (finally) in 1972, CHS began to open up opportunities to female athletes.

The school, which already had a strong basketball tradition on the boys side of the court, launched its girls program in 1974 … and promptly sent the players down the road.

While the boys hoops stars practiced in the same gym in which they played their home games, the Wolf girls trekked to Fort Casey for their workouts.

“No heat and the out-of-bounds lines were the walls!,” remembers Martha Folsom.

It wasn’t until 1977 that the Wolf girls finally got a full share of the home gym for practices, but the early road trips didn’t keep players from showing up, as the first squad boasted a full 12-player varsity roster.

While I’m tracking down the history of CHS girls basketball, the ’74-’75 team is still hidden in the shadows a bit.

The Whidbey News-Times elected to not write a single word about that season, and it was only with year two — and the arrival of a new sports writer — that things changed.

So, stat-wise, I haven’t been able to find much yet. But the hunt goes on.

We do have photos and a roster, though, thanks to a school yearbook kept by Folsom.

By the time the ’86-’87 team took the court, the program was more than a decade old and things were starting to take shape.

No Wolf girl topped 150 points in a season until Kristan Hurlburt went off for 263 in 1981-1982.

Two years later Judy Marti set a new mark, pouring in 312 points during her senior season.

Enter the ’86-’87 squad, which scored like no Wolf girls team before it, with two players, Terry Perkins (314) and Marlene Grasser (307) joining Marti in the 300-point club.

Tina Barker (274) just missed making it a trio, while Sarah Powell (141) and Aimee Messner (88) were also scoring threats for a deep, balanced team.

Led by head coach Phyllis Textor, the Wolves finished 15-8 overall, 11-5 in league play, coming within a single win of making it all the way to state in the program’s playoff debut.

The CHS girls finally cracked that barrier in 1998, advancing to the big dance with Willie Smith coaching, before capturing the program’s first state tourney win in 2000.

After that came three state banners (a sixth-place and two eight-place finishes) during Greg Oldham’s tenure, and the Wolf girls have gone back to state as recently as 2016 under David King.

There can be a solid argument made that girls basketball is the most consistently successful sports program at CHS over the past two decades.

But that all started with the athletes we honor today, the ones who broke the playing barrier and the ones who broke the postseason barrier.

So welcome to our little digital shrine.

Inducted together, as teams.

1974-1975 squad:

Brenda Belcher
Suzanne Enders
Martha Folsom
Eileen Hanley
Tammie Hardie
Ann Kahler
Debbie Snyder
Tracy Snyder
Teresa Taylor
Jill Whitney
Janie Wilson
Jean Wyatt

1986-1987 squad:

Tina Barker
Sally Biskovich
Sherry Bonacci
Trudy Eaton
Carol Estes
Marlene Grasser
Aimee Messner
Cheryl Pangburn
Terry Perkins
Sarah Powell

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