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Seven weeks from today, junior Hannah Davidson will likely help Coupeville kick off a new basketball season. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Seven weeks.

It’s both an eternity and a quick flick of the calendar.

And, as of today, seven weeks is exactly how long until the first official high school basketball game tips off.

Coupeville’s squads, led by David and Amy King (girls) and Brad Sherman and Chris Smith (boys) hit the courts Nov. 12 for the first day of practice, while the Wolf girls host Meridian Nov. 27 to start the 2018-19 season.

In preparation of that, CHS Athletic Director Willie Smith officially released the buffed, shined and (hopefully) final version of the schedules Tuesday afternoon.

As Wolf hoops kicks off its first voyage through the North Sound Conference, the two squads sit with 10 league games and eight non-league games apiece.

The girls get a true split schedule, with nine at home and nine on the road, while the boys will spend a bit more time on the bus, with a 10-8 split in favor of off-Island match-ups.

The most intriguing game on the schedule for either teams might be the opener for the CHS boys.

The foe in that game, a home tilt Nov. 28, is the big school to the North, 3A Oak Harbor.

It’s the first time the two schools have faced off in a regular-season hardwood game since Coupeville stunned the Wildcats 66-61 way back on Dec. 21, 2009.

 

This winter’s schedules (times are for JV and varsity, and * = league game):

 

GIRLS:

Tue-Nov. 27 — Meridian — (5:15/7:00)
Sat-Dec. 1 — Bush — (4:45/3:00)
Mon-Dec. 3 — @Sequim — (3:45/5:30)
Wed-Dec. 5 — Friday Harbor — (5:15/3:45)
Sat-Dec. 8 — @Orcas Island — (1:00/2:30)
Fri-Dec. 14 — @Concrete — (7:30/6:00)
Tue-Dec. 18 — Sultan — (5:00/6:45) *
Thur-Dec. 20 — Port Townsend — (3:30/5:15)
Sat-Dec. 22 — @Nooksack Valley — (2:45/1:00)
Fri-Jan. 4 — @King’s — (3:30/5:00) *
Tues-Jan. 8 — @Cedar Park Christian — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Jan. 11 — @Sultan — (3:30/6:30) *
Tue-Jan. 15 — Granite Falls — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Jan. 18 — South Whidbey — (5:00/6:45) *
Tue-Jan. 22 — @South Whidbey — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Jan. 25 — Cedar Park Christian — (5:00/6:45) *
Tue-Jan. 29 — King’s — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Feb. 1 — @Granite Falls — (3:30/6:30) *

 

BOYS:

Wed-Nov. 28 — Oak Harbor — (5:15/7:00)
Sat-Dec. 1 — Bush — (3:00/4:45)
Mon-Dec. 3 — @Sequim — (5:30/3:45)
Wed-Dec. 5 — Friday Harbor — (3:45/5:15)
Sat-Dec. 8 — @Orcas Island — (2:30/1:00)
Tue-Dec. 11 — Sultan — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Dec. 14 — @Concrete — (6:00/7:30)
Thur-Dec. 20 — @Port Townsend — (4:30/6:00)
Sat-Dec. 22 — @Nooksack Valley — (1:00/2:45)
Fri-Jan. 4 — @King’s — (3:30/6:45) *
Tue-Jan. 8 — Granite Falls — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Jan. 11 — @Sultan — (5:00/8:00) *
Tue-Jan. 15 — @Cedar Park Christian — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Jan. 18 — South Whidbey — (5:00/6:45) *
Tue-Jan. 22 — King’s — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Jan. 25 — Cedar Park Christian — (5:00/6:45) *
Tue-Jan. 29 — @South Whidbey — (5:00/6:45) *
Fri-Feb. 1 — @Granite Falls — (5:00/8:00) *

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Bob Fasolo and his band of hoops cutthroats. (Photo courtesy the Fasolo family)

He was the coolest coach to ever walk into a gym.

Except he didn’t walk, he strutted like the king of the jungle, cause that’s what he was.

Bob Fasolo has been gone for 10 years now, but we’ll still be telling tales about him 100 years down the road.

He always looked like he had a surfboard in hand, even when he didn’t, and he oozed raw, freakin’ coolness with every action and story he told.

I never wrote about any of his teams, but I spent a few nights in the gym playing hoops with him, always mesmerized by his ability to talk non-stop, swish jumpers and strut, all in the same fluid motion.

Every time we saw each other, in a gym, at the grocery store, or on one of his many frequent hang-outs at Videoville, sprawled across the counter, chewing on a Red Vine, as he debated his video choices, Bob was the ultimate pimp.

I don’t mean in the sense that he ran hookers on the corner, but that he was the coolest cat this side of a ’70s inner city crime epic.

Every time he said my name, he managed to take the words “Dave, my dude,” turn it into a free form jazz explosion that rumbled from somewhere down in his chest, then stretch the words out so far even Matthew McConaughey would have been like, “dang, son!”

Bob was the closest any Coupeville resident has ever come to being the living, breathing embodiment of The Dude.

If Jeff Bridges hadn’t been available to make “The Big Lebowski,” Bob would have done just fine in the role.

He was The Man, always and forever.

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Hawthorne Wolfe glides in for a bucket. (Photos by JohnsPhotos.net)

Wolfe, here streaking for home, was a key player on a Babe Ruth team which finished 2nd at state and advanced to regionals this summer.

Talent? Check.

Hard work and commitment? Check and check.

Hawthorne Wolfe is that rare young athlete who checks all the boxes, and his appearance in a Coupeville High School uniform this coming year is highly-anticipated.

On the basketball court, he’s a three ball-droppin’ terror who can also wheel and deal with the ball, while on the baseball diamond, Wolfe brings a slick glove, hot bat and fleet feet to the lineup.

During his middle school days, Wolfe also played football, but, for the moment at least, he’s stepping off the gridiron to focus on his other two sports.

While he shines in all his sporting endeavors, the fast-rising young star hails hoops as his favorite pastime.

“It’s a team sport and at times can be individual,” Wolfe explained. “It’s also fast-paced, as well as fun.”

On a CMS team where all five starters felt comfortable firing up balls from behind the three-point arc, Wolfe was the deadliest last season.

Operating like NBA stars such as Steph Curry, or future CHS teammate Mason Grove, Wolfe has already showcased an often uncanny ability to get his shot off quickly, and from any angle.

Shooting on the move, while going either direction, he often proved deadliest when putting up balls in the flow of action.

Give him time to spot up and it was even more likely to result in a taste of splash city.

The commitment factor came into play vividly after one game, when, unhappy with his performance (despite leading Coupeville to a win), he ran laps around the gym.

A slight chuckle came from one of his coaches as Wolfe, not satisfied with his initial self-administered punishment, decided to double his running.

Commitment like that carried over to many of his teammates, and the middle school hoops team was a tightly-knit, successful squad.

Now, as Wolfe and most of his teammates prepare to swap out CMS uniforms for ones which read CHS, that sense of commitment continues to burn brightly.

“I want to hopefully go to state in all sports,” Wolfe said. “And, if possible, which I think it is, win state and so on.”

Away from the court or diamond, he’s fond of playing video games and spends a fair amount of time “watching sports or going to sporting events with my dad or family.”

When he’s in uniform himself, or working to get ready, Wolfe strives to mesh his skills with his teammates, well aware a solid team can go further than just a single athlete.

“It shows that you can work with others well and you get to have fun playing sports competitively,” he said. “I think I’m a good teammate; I mean, I recommend asking some of my teammates first.”

While he always wants to keep the competitive fires raging, Wolfe is also on a mission to find proper balance.

“I would like to work on not getting frustrated at things I shouldn’t get frustrated at,” he said with a small smile.

Whether dropping in treys from long distance, or slaving away over school work, Wolfe has a deep appreciation for his support crew.

“Well, obviously my parents and grandparents and all my coaches have been great on helping me,” he said. “I can’t think of one who hasn’t.

“But when it comes to teammates, I would say Caleb Meyer, just cause me and him are always competitive,” Wolfe added. “He helps me, I help him, and we strive to be great together, whether it’s in the gym or outside.”

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Coupeville grad Makana Stone (left), on tour with an all-star basketball team in Brazil, poses with a local player. (Photos courtesy Stone)

Team USA, ready to rumble on foreign soil.

Visiting the world-famous, 125-foot high, Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio.

Stone, who will be a junior at Whitman College, reps her Team USA colors.

Basketball has been very, very good to Makana Stone.

The hoops life has taken the Coupeville grad around the world, with a big highlight being a trip to Brazil that’s just wrapping up.

Stone, a junior at Whitman College, was picked to be part of a 10-player USA D-III women’s basketball team.

She and her teammates played four games in Brazil, facing off with squads from Jundiai, Santa Andre, Queimados and Fluminese.

The second of those four rivals was a pro team.

For Stone, who was an All-League First-Team pick during her sophomore season at Whitman, the trip has been everything she expected, and more.

“It has been a once in a lifetime experience!,” she said. “I’ve gotten the opportunity to play with some of the USA and Brazil’s best players.

“The talent out here is unreal,” Stone added. “I’m thankful to have been able to have the chance to play with and against it.”

While on the trip, the Team USA players (a men’s squad joined Stone and Co. on the road) got to experience the culture and food of Brazil.

They also had an opportunity to work with the next generation of hoops stars, something Stone loved.

“One of my favorite parts of this trip was being able to hold a clinic for Brazilian kids in Rio,” she said.

The act of putting the ball in the hoop bridged any gaps between people from different countries.

“There was a bit of a language barrier and they laughed at my attempts to use Portuguese,” Stone said with a chuckle.

“But, there’s really nothing like making new friends through a little basketball on the streets of Rio!”

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Aiden Burdge heads back up court after nailing a three-point bomb in a middle school hoops game. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

When Aiden Burdge wants to see his greatest opponent, he looks in the mirror.

The Coupeville High School freshman, who follows a path carved by talented older sisters Kylie and Kiara, has a clear focus when he settles in to run a race or shoot a basketball.

Get better, every time out, and push himself to get the most he can out of his abilities.

“My strength as an athlete is my determination to push at a challenge until I overcome it,” Burdge said. “I need to work on discipline and training, because the older I get, the harder I have to push myself to get better.”

While he was a quick, three-ball-shootin’ wonder on the basketball court in middle school, it’s track and field which captivates Burdge.

“My favorite sport is track because it’s a great feeling to fly through the air and I know I can only improve,” he said. “I enjoy the challenge that’s in front of me and I want to get better.”

Track, above most other sports, is all about self-improvement — getting a PR, shaving a few seconds off your best time or picking up a few more inches on a throw.

That chance to compete against himself, and see his progress reflected back, is a big part of why Burdge enjoys the sport so much.

“My goal in my high school sports career is the same as my middle school sports career goal – to beat my own records,” he said.

Burdge is part of a large, tightly-knit family, and he appreciates the support he gets from his three sisters and parents Aaron and Trina.

Whether he’s playing a sport, knocking out tunes on the piano, or spending time with his family, the young Wolf star knows he has their full support and love.

“My parents and my siblings all pushed me to be better and to put forth my best effort,” Burdge said. “And for that I’m grateful.”

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