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Scout Smith will enter her senior season as the #1 active scorer among CHS girls basketball players. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

There’s madness in the numbers.

Trying to track individual scoring totals through 147 seasons of Coupeville High School basketball – 102 for the boys, 45 for the girls – is a good way to fry your brain.

And yet, I persist, because basketball is my favorite sport, because points are the most concrete stat we have, and because I refuse to give up.

When I look at the master scoring chart I have compiled, I feel good about the girls side and semi-good about the boys.

Other than the inaugural 1974-1975 season, which the Whidbey News-Times all but ignored, I have 99.2% complete scoring totals for every other girls campaign.

I’m missing a game or three from the mid-2000’s, but, other than that, I’ve accounted for 34,452 points scored by 224 Wolf girls.

Over on the boys side, things are a bit more difficult.

I’m golden from the 1954-1955 season to today, but pre-’54 is a scattershot mess of missing score-books, inadequate newspaper articles and players and teams lost to the mists of times.

What I do have, and it’s more than anyone else out there, is a scoring chart reflecting 391 Wolf boys combining to rattle the rim for 73,296 points.

So, a start.

As the 2018-2019 seasons unfolded, I updated my master list after every game.

Now, I could have waited until the end of the season, but it was more fun to do it in the moment, watching current players move up, sometimes a single slot, sometimes leapfrogging a pack of five or six former Wolves in a single burst.

By the time we wrapped, the departing seniors had cemented their place in history, at least until someone else comes flying past them.

Lindsey Roberts made the deepest run, tossing in 448 points in four varsity seasons, finishing in a tie with Vanessa Davis at #18 on the all-time girls chart.

Then, there was Ema Smith (228 points in two seasons, #48 all-time), Dane Lucero (20 points in two seasons, #300 all-time), and Nicole Laxton (15 points in one season, #170 all-time).

Looking forward, 20 of 24 varsity players from this past season can return, 11 boys and nine girls.

So where do they sit on the all-time scoring chart? Glad you asked.

 

Girls:

Scout Smith – (142 points) – (56 as a sophomore, 86 as a junior) – (#78 all-time)

Chelsea Prescott – (139 points) – (38 as a freshman, 101 as a sophomore) – (#81)

Avalon Renninger – (59 points) – (3 as a sophomore, 56 as a junior) – (#118)

Hannah Davidson – (42 points) – (11 as a sophomore, 31 as a junior) – (#136)

Tia Wurzrainer – (18 points) – (18 as a junior) – (#165)

Izzy Wells – (11 points) – (11 as a freshman) – (#178)

Mollie Bailey – (8 points) – (8 as a sophomore) – (#184)

Ja’Kenya Hoskins – (5 points) – (5 as a freshman) – (#203)

Anya Leavell – (4 points) – (4 as a freshman) – (#205)

 

Boys:

Mason Grove – (160 points) – (51 as a sophomore, 109 as a junior) – (#153 all-time)

Hawthorne Wolfe – (158 points) – (158 as a freshman) – (#154)

Sean Toomey-Stout – (122 points) – (122 as a junior) – (#170)

Jered Brown – (100 points) – (5 as a freshman, 24 as a sophomore, 71 as a junior) – (#183)

Ulrik Wells – (78 points) – (4 as a sophomore, 74 as a junior) – (#200)

Gavin Knoblich – (70 points) – (5 as a sophomore, 65 as a junior) – (#212)

Jacobi Pilgrim – (44 points) – (1 as a sophomore, 43 as a junior) – (#253)

Koa Davison – (11 points) – (11 as a junior) – (#330)

Jean Lund-Olsen – (7 points) – (7 as a junior) – (#353)

Xavier Murdy – (4 points) – (4 as a freshman) – (#368)

Daniel Olson – (3 points) – (3 as a sophomore) – (#374)

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Coupeville’s Makana Stone went off for 17 points and 11 rebounds Saturday, helping Whitman earn a win and a home playoff game. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

A sizable collection of Coupeville folks showed up in Tacoma to root for their serene superstar. (Kristi Etzell photo)

Stone netted 7-8 free throw attempts in the win. (Etzell photo)

Stone reunites with former CHS classmates (l to r) Nick Etzell, McKenzie Meyer, Danny Conlisk, and Marisa Etzell. (Eileen Stone photo)

Guess who gets to host a home playoff game after all?

The last day of the regular season broke perfectly for the Whitman College women’s basketball team and its Coupeville star, the ever-rampaging Makana Stone.

With the former Wolf ace going off for 17 points and 11 rebounds in front of an enthusiastic group of hometown fans and friends, the Blues crunched host Pacific Lutheran 73-62 in Tacoma.

Meanwhile, across town, Puget Sound was stunned 61-56 by Whitworth.

That means Whitman, which finishes 13-3 in Northwest Conference play and is 19-6 overall, claims second-place in the nine-team league and will host UPS (12-4, 19-5) Feb. 21 in the first round of the NWC tourney.

Conference champ George Fox (15-1, 22-3) hosts #4 Linfield (8-8, 12-13) the same day, with the winners meeting Feb. 23 in the title game.

The tourney champs earn an automatic bid to the NCAA D-III national championships.

Wrapping up a two-game trip to the wilds of Tacoma, Whitman bounced back strongly Saturday after falling by five points Friday at UPS.

The Blues opened the game with a nice splat, thanks to Taylor Chambers connecting on a long three-ball.

After a couple of early ties, Stone went to work, hitting back-to-back buckets to break open a 9-9 stalemate and give Whitman a lead it would never relinquish.

Up 19-16 after one, the Blues stretched the lead to 37-28 by the halftime break.

PLU, which entered the day in a three-way tie for the league’s fourth, and final, playoff berth, cut the lead all the way back to a single point midway through the second half, but Stone wasn’t having it.

She pumped in seven points in the third quarter, then added another four in the fourth.

Stone rose to the occasion down the stretch, getting key points in the final three minutes, when Whitman back-handed its upstart hosts back into reality.

Out-leaping two defenders, Stone snagged an offensive rebound and promptly crashed hard to the hoop, earning two well-deserved free throw attempts with 2:42 left in the game.

Netting both (she hit 7-8 from the charity stripe on the night), the Whitman junior staked her squad to a 62-55 lead.

A minute later she was right back at it, gunning down the floor and pulling in an outlet pass for a running layup to push the margin out to double digits.

With Whitman senior Maegan Martin following up with back-to-back breakaway layups of her own, the Blues shoved the lead out to 14 before PLU ended its season with a buzzer-beating three-ball.

The Blues big three were the key to the game, as usual.

Stone added a crucial steal to go with her 17 and 11 double-double, while Mady Burdett singed the nets for 16 points, and Martin added 14 points and 12 boards of her own.

Kaelan Shamseldin, who nailed a late three-ball that punched a hole through the hearts of PLU fans, had 11 points as Whitman put four players into double-digits scoring.

Emma Janousek paced PLU with a team-high 15.

Heading into the playoffs, Stone has set personal-bests in virtually every statistical category, and now has 356 points, 203 rebounds, 40 assists, 26 steals and 18 blocks on the season.

She’s shooting 149-290 (51.4%) from the floor and 57-73 (78.1%) from the line.

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Kailey Kellner tossed in eight points Saturday during the final game of her sophomore basketball season at D’Youville College. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Kailey Kellner reached the end of the season doing what she does best – putting the ball in the bucket.

The Coupeville grad, now a sophomore at D’Youville College in New York, rattled the rim for eight points Saturday as the Spartans celebrated Senior Night with an 82-67 win over visiting Franciscan University.

The victory lifts D’Youville’s final record to 7-11 in Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference action, 10-15 overall.

The top six teams in the league advance to the playoffs, but the Spartans missed out on a postseason berth by a single win.

D’Youville finished strongly, winning two of its final three games, but a 2-7 stretch right before that made it hard to climb any higher in the 10-team conference.

From the outside, one could argue Kellner should have gotten more playing time, since the turnaround started when the former Wolf was inserted into the starting lineup for the first time this season.

Saturday, the Spartans honored seniors Monica June, Darian Evans, and Jordan Smith, then put the game away in the second quarter.

After heading into the first break knotted up at 12-12, D’Youville went on a 21-12 run across the next 10 minutes.

Kellner tossed in four of her eight points during the surge, and from there it was easy street for the Spartans.

Coasting home for the win with 26-24 and 23-20 advantages across the final two quarters, D’Youville sent its seniors, and the fans, back out into the 29-degree Buffalo weather with smiles on their faces.

Filling up the stat sheet, Kellner snatched four rebounds and dealt out an assist to go along with her eight points.

For the season, if you believe the D’Youville stat page (and that’s questionable, as Kellner was dinged twice this season by score-keepers who gave credit for her baskets to others), Coupeville’s progeny finished with 76 points, 44 rebounds, 17 assists and four steals.

Her best stat was her free-throw shooting, where she knocked down 14 of 19 shots. That pencils out to 73.7%, and was among the best totals posted by a Spartan in 2018-2019.

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Makana Stone (23) and her Whitman teammates will need everything to break right Saturday for them to host a playoff game. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Six days from now, the Whitman College women’s basketball team will be in the playoffs.

But, barring a last-second reversal of fortune Saturday, the Blues and former Coupeville star Makana Stone will start the postseason on the road.

Despite a strong second-half rally Friday, Whitman couldn’t quite make up for a poor first half, falling 60-55 to the University of Puget Sound.

The road loss, coming in the next-to-last regular season game, drops the Blues, 12-3 in Northwest Conference play, 18-6 overall, into a tie for second-place with UPS (12-3).

But, since the Loggers swept the season series, also winning 75-67 in Walla Walla Jan. 19, they hold the tiebreaker.

Unless Whitman beats Pacific Lutheran (7-8) Saturday and UPS falls to Whitworth (7-8), the Blues will be the #3 seed to the four-team NWC tourney.

League champ George Fox (15-1) hosts whichever 7-8 team — PLU, Whitworth or Linfield — emerges Saturday to claim the #4 seed, while #2 hosts #3.

The first round of the single-elimination tourney goes down Feb. 21, with the title game Feb. 23.

The tourney champ gets an automatic bid to the NCAA D-III national championships, while other NWC teams will sweat out the announcement of at-large teams.

Friday’s loss came down largely to one really bad five-minute-plus stretch in the second quarter.

Whitman led through much of the first quarter, and, even after finally losing the advantage, was still hanging tough down 21-16 with 6:20 to play in the first half.

Unfortunately for the Blues, their shooting touch promptly went into deep freeze, and Puget Sound took advantage.

Using a 14-0 tear over the next five minutes and 32 seconds, the Loggers turned a close game into a potential blowout.

Kaelan Shamseldin finally snapped the scoring drought, pulling off a three-point play the hard way, but her bucket and free throw could only trim the halftime deficit to 35-19.

The second half was a different story, as Whitman shaved away at the lead with 17-9 and 19-16 runs across the final two periods.

Stone drained a jumper to pull the Blues within four points late in the third quarter, then slipped a free throw through the net to slice the margin to 49-46 with a hair under four minutes to play in the game.

Puget Sound hung tough down the stretch, though.

Even with the league’s arguably-best player, Jamie Lange, held to just seven points, the Loggers found just enough offense to persevere.

Elizabeth Prewitt rattled the rim for a game-high 20, with seven of those points coming down the stretch, to pace UPS.

For Whitman, Mady Burdett scorched the nets for 18, and the lone Blues senior, Maegan Martin, notched a double-double with 16 points and 11 rebounds.

Stone, who had to battle through foul trouble, finished with seven points, six rebounds, and an assist, while being restricted to just 13 minutes of floor time.

The former Wolf ace is sitting with 339 points, 192 rebounds, 40 assists, 25 steals, and 18 blocks for her junior campaign.

She’s shooting 144-276 from the field, and 50-65 from the line.

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Tim Quenzer (30) is the only player in CHS basketball history to score varsity points while repping a last name that starts with Q.

Kari Iverson stands alone.

There have been 147 seasons of basketball played at Coupeville High School – 102 by the boys and 45 by the girls, at least in the post-Title IX world – and, in that time, only one player with a last name starting with “I” has scored a point at the varsity level.

Iverson tossed in eight points across two seasons, scoring four in each of her two varsity seasons (1990-91 and 1991-92), to claim the honor.

She would have likely had more, but missed her senior season in 92-93 after a bad car accident.

That tidbit is just one of many I found as I wiled away some of my Snowmageddon time by going through basketball scoring records in a bid to discover who were the highest scoring players by last name.

Now, I will admit, my record-collecting isn’t finished … yet.

I have virtually complete scoring totals for 44 of the 45 seasons of girls basketball. The one to elude me, so far, is the debut team in 1974-1975.

The Whidbey News-Times of the day (shamefully) had nothing to say about that season, and the school’s yearbook has photos, but no scoring totals.

But I do have a roster, and there’s no “I” players to be found.

With boys basketball, I can claim to be on fairly solid ground with 69 of 102 seasons. And with the way records have generally been allowed to blow free in the breeze at CHS, that’s saying something.

As I piece things together, I have individual scoring totals for every season from 1954-1955 to today, but pre-’50s scoring marks have been tough to uncover.

Now, I can tell you Roy Armstrong topped Coupeville with 80 points during the 1924-1925 season, and Banky Fisher edged out Gaylord Stidham 44-41 for the 1939-1940 scoring title.

But, other than success with scattered seasons — the Bruzas brothers, Joe (71) and Stanley (48) combined to tally 119 of 186 points scored in 1926-1927, in case you were wondering — uncovering the early years of Wolf basketball remains my Raiders of the Lost Ark-style adventure.

If there’s a holy grail, it’s the 1953-1954 boys season.

The yearbook had a roster, but no scoring totals, preventing me from cementing the status of Jack Elzinga and Tom Sahli.

With Sahli, I know he scored 310 points in 1952-1953, but am missing his totals for 1951-1952 and 1953-1954.

Elzinga is even more tantalizing, as I know he rattled the rims for 337 in 1954-1955 and another 309 in 1955-1956.

That two-year total of 646 points puts “The Zinger” in 25th place on the all-time Wolf boys scoring chart, and yet, how high is he really?

Did he score 100 points in what I presume was his sophomore season? If so, he catapults up to #16. Or, if he notched 222 or more, he’s cracked the top 10.

Of course, being his first season on varsity, Elzinga’s scoring total might be much lower than his other two years. Even so, it’s frustrating to not be able to firmly place him in the pantheon.

But, for now, we go with what we have.

And what we have says there’s never been a CHS player, girls or boy, who scored at the varsity level while repping a last name starting with U or X.

There’s been one guy upholding the honor of Q, as Tim Quenzer scorched the nets for 202 points during the 1969-1970 campaign, but no Q girls.

Top it off with the odd twist of no boy with a last name starting with I, and no girl with one starting with N or Z.

The biggest surprise for me is N, but, maybe it shouldn’t have been, as only five boys — Ron Naddy, Frank Nelson, Dan Nieder, Bill Nienhuis, and Chad Nixon — check in on that side of the ledger.

Maybe N isn’t as common as I thought.

At the least, N, on the boys side, comes in ahead of Z (John Zimmerman and Denny, Jerry, and Larry Zylstra) and Y (Jim YakeCurt and Tim Youderian).

Other factoids I found:

E and O are the only letters where the leading scorers are related.

O offers up the sister/brother combo of Kendra and Kramer O’Keefe (uncle Randy, who played when the family still went by Keefe, leads the K boys) while E gives us Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby and dad Wade Ellsworth.

Wade’s spot is hanging by a thread, though, as he’s a mere 13 points up on Elzinga (659-646), with “The Zinger’s” missing season still lurking out there somewhere in the mists of time.

Megan Smith and Bill Riley are the highest-scoring players who are NOT also the highest-scoring players with a last name starting with their letter.

Riley is #6 on the boys all-time chart with 934 points, but #4 Jeff Rhubottom (1012) edges him out for R bragging rights.

Smith (1042) sits even higher, at #4 for the girls program, but #3 Makana Stone (1158) is a rung above her, while also carrying an S last name.

Best letter to start your last name with if you want to be a top-10 career scorer? S.

Smith, Makana Stone, Jeff Stone (tied for #1), and Brad Sherman (#8) pull their initial highest, edging out B, which is brought to the dance by Mike Bagby (tied for #1), Zenovia Barron (#2), and Lexie Black (#8).

The most productive letter? K.

Brianne King (1549) and Randy Keefe (1088) combine for 2,637 points, topping the 2,407 flung up by B (Zenovia Barron – 1270 and Mike Bagby – 1137) and the 2295 offered by S (Makana Stone – 1158 and Jeff Stone – 1137).

And, last but certainly not least, is the tightest race, which played out among boys whose last names start with T.

Eight have broken 100, three have topped 200, but the title came down between a duo who hit for 300+.

Charlie Tessaro tossed in 93 points in 1984-1985, then led his squad with 235 the next season, finishing with 328 for his career.

Which I thought would be tops, but it wasn’t.

Aaron Trumbull never reached the heights Tessaro did in 85-86, but he benefited from being a rock-solid four-year varsity vet from 2011-2012 to 2014-2015.

The kind of player who did everything – rebound, defend, set screens for the big gunners – he also proved to be a solid backup scoring option.

From six points as a freshman, Trumbull jumped to 106 as a sophomore (#3 on the team), 70 as a junior, then 148 (#2 on the team) during his senior season.

His final basket gave him 330 points, edging Tessaro in the closest race I could find.

 

CHS career scoring leaders by last name:

 

A – Amanda Allmer (331), Mitch Aparicio (195)

B – Zenovia Barron (1270), Mike Bagby (1137)

C – Jen Canfield (497), Mike Criscuola (979)

D – Vanessa Davis (448), Randy Duggan (552)

E – Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby (892), Wade Ellsworth (659)

F – Amanda Fabrizi (299), Foster Faris (668)

G – Marlene Grasser (574), Arik Garthwaite (867)

H – Kristan Hurlburt (598), Hunter Hammer (755)

I – Kari Iverson (8), (no boy)

J – Annette Jameson (223), Bill Jarrell (855)

K – Brianne King (1549), Randy Keefe (1088)

L – Tina Lyness (594), David Lortz (502)

M – Judy Marti (545), Jason McFadyen (654)

N – (no girl), Dan Nieder (729)

O – Kendra O’Keefe (244), Kramer O’Keefe (636)

P – Ann Pettit (932), Pete Petrov (917)

Q – (no girl), Tim Quenzer (202)

R – Lindsey Roberts (448), Jeff Rhubottom (1012)

S – Makana Stone (1158), Jeff Stone (1137)

T – Tracy Taylor (350), Aaron Trumbull (330)

U – (no girl or boy)

V – Emily Vracin (467), Michael Vaughan (337)

W – Maureen Wetmore (438), Steve Whitney (730)

X – (no girl or boy)

Y – Emily Young (149), Jim Yake (331)

Z – (no girl), Denny Zylstra (538)

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