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Posts Tagged ‘in memory’

Joey Glendenning

In memory of Joey Glendenning, mom of Coupeville High School softball player Lacy McCraw-Shirron:

 

Joey, 44, was born March 26, 1977 in Manteca, Calif., to Jimmy and Judi McCraw.

During high school she lettered in swimming and soccer, and graduated in 1995 from Manteca High.

After graduation Joey stayed in Manteca where she began her proud life of motherhood; first in 1997 with her son Devon, followed by her daughter Lacy six years later.

They were the sole light of her life for 18 months, when in 2004, and after first meeting 11 years prior, she reunited with Ansel Glendenning.

In June 2008, Joey, Ansel, Devon, and Lacy became one family under God at a beautiful wedding ceremony in Newcastle, Calif.

Joey quickly fell in love with being a Navy wife, and she cherished the extended friends and families she met on Whidbey Island, Wash., followed by Poquoson, Va., and recently back to Whidbey again.

During these moves she spent many hours learning the art of cooking, the green thumb of gardening, and the joy of canning and preserving the fruits of her labors.

Joey shared these passion projects with her family and friends by not only gifting her jams, jellies, and all sorts of other goodies; she also would teach anyone who wanted to learn as she considered everyone a friend.

Many hours were spent over pots of simmering sauces, boiling pots of water, and the popping sound of metal lids cooling on the counter.

Joey’s three proudest moments were becoming a Navy wife with Ansel, a Navy mom with Devon and Lacy’s upcoming Class of 2021 graduation in June.

On March 31, 2021, Joey was reunited in Heaven with Jimmy, her daddy, whom she missed dearly.

Joey is survived by her endearing husband of 13 years, Ansel, their son Devon McCraw and daughter Lacy McCraw-Glendenning.

She is also survived by her mother Judi McCraw; older sister Tami De Jong; and older brother Dustin McCraw.

Her final resting place will be on the mountain, that she loved so much.

A Celebration of Life will be at 11 a.m., Saturday April 17 at Grace Community Church, 29470 SR 20, Oak Harbor WA 98277.

Another service in West Point, Calif., will be announced at a later time.

In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Joey Glendenning Memorial Fund at Grace Community Church.

Joey Glendenning with daughter Lacy and husband Ansel. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

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Dr. Suzanne Bond, former Coupeville Schools Superintendent. (Photos courtesy Simonson/Bond family)

Suzanne Bond was a strong leader with a big heart.

During the six years she spent as Superintendent of Coupeville Public Schools, the district blossomed.

Student scores in the Washington Assessment of Student Learning tests rose under her leadership, while a levy passed with a very-strong 72 percent favorable vote.

Dr. Bond was also a kind woman, one who always greeted me with a smile when she and her family came in to Videoville or Miriam’s Espresso.

The following remembrance is from her family:

 

On the morning of March 3, 2021, Suzanne S. Bond of Coupeville, Washington, died peacefully at home at the age of 70.

She was surrounded by her family.

Suzanne was a devoted mother, a loving wife, a leader by example, and a beloved friend.

Named Victoria Suzanne Bednorz by her parents, she always preferred to be called Suzanne.

Born to Twila Darlene Vice and Edwin Gilbert Bednorz, Suzanne arrived on August 9th, 1950, in Tacoma, Washington.

She had one older brother, Edwin Gene “Rusty” Bednorz.

Suzanne’s first husband was Howard Lee Simonson. They were married in 1971.

In 1987 the twins were born, Cavan and Zachary.

In 1994, Suzanne married her second husband, Dan Noel Bond.

She wrote about Dan saying, “He is my heart connection to the world; we have important work to do together.”

In so many ways, Suzanne was exceptional.

She came from modest beginnings. She believed strongly in the power of education and had an unquenchable thirst for knowledge.

She earned her B.A. and Masters of Education at Western Washington State College, then her Doctor of Education from Seattle University in 1982.

Suzanne began her teaching career as the business education instructor at Juanita High School and then rose to the Assistant Principal position.

She later became Principal of Mariner High School for a period of eight years before moving into the Mukilteo School District Office as Director of Staff Development and Special Projects.

In 1996 Suzanne accepted the School Superintendent position for Coupeville Schools.

In Coupeville, Suzanne made her deepest impact as Superintendent.

She helped instill character education and development within the school district.

She fostered engagement between the business community and the district.

Numerous businesses displayed the Coupeville School’s “Words to Live By,” which included: Respect, Caring, Responsibility, Contribution, Honesty, Integrity, Courage, Compassion, Cooperation, and Perseverance.

Suzanne retired in 2002 but returned to education shortly after as Associate Professor in the Educational Leadership program at Seattle Pacific University.

Suzanne lived a life of service through education.

With her heart for kids, contagious smile, and ready laughter, she made friends everywhere she went.

She was deeply spiritual and compassionate and raised her children to put others first.

Suzanne is survived by her husband Dan and children, Cavan and Zach.

 

The family is hosting an online Celebration of Life Sunday, March 28 at 1:00 PM PST.

To attend, pop over to the link below, where you can register.

Suzanne Bond Memorial Page | Lighten (lightenarrangements.com)

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Lori Fredericks 

The kindness in her smile, and the joy in her voice, is what I will remember.

Through the Videoville years and beyond, every time I saw Lori Fredericks, my day was brighter for it.

She was a truly lovely human being, and it was a blessing to know her.

 

From her family:

In Memory of Lori (Fredericks) Hillard, March 16, 1978-December 2020.

Mother, sister, daughter, aunt, friend, Registered Nurse … you were always and will always be loved and held deep in our hearts.

Cheerleader and lover of all pets!

Life of the party … your smile will forever shine.

Although your presence is already missed … we know you’re resting peacefully in mother’s arms.

A memorial service will take place mid-February in Coupeville for family and private invite only.

In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Madelyn Hillard college fund which will be set up at the Whidbey Island Bank in Coupeville.

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Steve Schorr

Longtime Las Vegas resident Steve Schorr died Thursday in Nevada.

He was 74, and died of natural causes, according to a statement issued by his family.

Schorr lived and worked for decades in Sin City, but came to the attention of Whidbey Island when he launched a YouTube show, The Whidbey Buzz, in May, 2019.

The twice-weekly broadcast, primarily a mix of regurgitated press releases and info lifted from local newspapers, was shot in front of a digital screen with the assistance of Rigel Studios, formerly known as Ads4TV.

That company is owned by Rick Manning, who, like Schorr, worked for Nevada TV stations in previous decades.

The Buzz was a carbon copy of other Rigel Studios-produced shows, but Manning declined to speak about it when I messaged him in June, 2019.

Despite assurances Schorr didn’t bite, the Vegas lifer quickly proved unwilling to answer many questions.

This included refusing to provide his legally-mandated federal tax number after declaring The Buzz was a non-profit, then blocking on Facebook a former CPA who asked for the information.

There was confusion at first when the show launched, as Schorr, who lived 1,200+ miles from Whidbey, seemed to have no connection to our Island.

Later, it was revealed he had at least one – a friendship with former Vegas resident Scott Thompson.

The Sin City transplant has spent several years trying, and failing, to gain approval for a proposed housing development known as Wright’s Crossing.

Schorr and Thompson met in Vegas when the former, who also operated Penny Lane Dobermans with his wife, sold the latter a dog.

This was something they acknowledged when we spoke in person before a sparsely-attended Buzz meet and greet in the small, windowless basement of the Oak Harbor Best Western.

Schorr, however, never told his viewers about this relationship when featuring Thompson or any of his businesses on the Buzz, a clear violation of longstanding journalistic ethics.

This culminated with a recent show in which the anchor allowed the builder, and a rep from Wave Broadband, to promote proposed internet service for the proposed housing development in a 15-minute piece, without disclosing their personal relationship.

Thompson later posted that Buzz episode to the Whidbey Island Community page on Facebook, referring to the video as a “press release.”

The proposed Wright’s Crossing development is currently a giant pile of twisted, uprooted trees and a lonely office trailer perched on the hill above Safeway and Wal-Mart in Oak Harbor.

Thompson, despite financially backing candidates in both Oak Harbor City Council and Island County Commissioner races, has failed so far to build much support for his development among local officials.

Dan Evans, not the popular former state Governor, but a transplant from Minnesota, lost his recent Commissioner race to two-term incumbent Jill Johnson by 10,000+ votes, one of the largest margins in recent Island county political battles.

During the race, Thompson and his wife were the largest financial contributors to Evans, donating a perfectly legal amount according to public records.

The duo, and former Oak Harbor Mayor DeVere “Scott” Dudley, best known for not being allowed to sign city checks during his time in office, were among a group which relentlessly leveled personal attacks at Johnson, a lifelong Oak Harbor resident.

While questions about others financial involvement in The Buzz were frequent, Schorr repeatedly insisted he, and he alone, financed the show.

If true, Friday’s broadcast, hosted by a fill-in, former Vegas TV anchor Casey Smith, could be the final broadcast of the show.

Smith, capping an 18-month run of The Buzz botching local names and area history, had a big stumble at the end.

And yes, he pronounced it on camera exactly as it’s shown on screen.

 

Neither Smith or anyone at The Buzz have responded to requests for info on the future of the YouTube show.

 

To follow my winding relationship with Schorr, here is a timeline of previous stories I published:

 

https://coupevillesports.com/2019/06/30/let-the-sun-shine-in/

https://coupevillesports.com/2019/07/11/vegas-legend-buzzes-whidbey/

https://coupevillesports.com/2020/06/04/vegas-scalawags/

https://coupevillesports.com/2020/06/10/rumble-sin-city/

https://coupevillesports.com/2020/06/12/swing-and-a-miss-sir/

 

UPDATE – Sunday 7:40 PM:

Scott Thompson, who still lacks the permits to build Wright’s Crossing, says I am a “sick human being, a punk, and an asshole.”

So, I got that going for me.

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If you ever came to Videoville back in the day, you’ve seen at least a few minutes of Bugsy Malone. Trust me.

“You give a little love and it all comes back to you, you’re gonna be remembered for the things that you say and do.”

That’s the closing mantra of Bugsy Malone, a movie musical like no other.

No, seriously.

Someone plopped down in a cushy chair at a Hollywood studio, looked the big man in the eye, and calmly said, “So, see, it’s The Godfather, but they sing and dance, and all the guns shoot cream pies, cause … the entire cast is KIDS!!!!”

And then they got the green light, and movie nirvana was made.

No, seriously.

Through 12 years at Videoville, I tried to play as many offbeat movies as possible on the in-store TV’s, just to keep people on their toes.

And also because as my middle nephew is fond of saying, with all the gravitas a 10-year-old can muster, “Uncle David, you like weird movies!!!!”

It’s true, and he doesn’t know the half of it.

So Videoville patrons got to experience, whether they wanted to or not, the sweet, sweet music of what-the-heck-is-that gems like Phantom of the Paradise, Rover Dangerfield, Reefer Madness: The Movie Musical, Shock Treatment, and The Apple.

We’re talking songs like “Bitchin’ in the Kitchen,” which begins:

Dear blender
Oh won’t you help a first offender
Oh, toaster
Don’t you put the burn on me

It’s gold, Jerry, gold!

Plus some warblin’ from Dwight Yoakam, the dance floor being torn up by Ann-Margaret, and a tangy mix of foreign musicals, from Bollywood to Umbrellas of Cherbourg to probably way too much opera in full-throated Italian.

But it was Bugsy Malone which got the most play of any musical, as I made my best attempt to wear out that VHS tape.

I love the movie, the way it takes everything seriously, never stopping to say, “Wait, those are 10-year-old kids wearing fake Clark Gable-style mustaches.”

Fat Sam and Dandy Dan operate as if they’re Brando marshalling the troops as Don Corleone, and I am there for it.

Bugsy Malone has songs that pop, gunfights that deliver a solid … plop, and a 14-year-old Jodie Foster, the best actress of my lifetime, is the cherry on top as Tallulah, a fast-talkin’, wise-crackin’, torch-song-singin’ sensation.

I see you Silence of the Lambs, Taxi Driver, and Nell, and I’m gonna let you finish, but you’re not a true Foster Fanatic unless you love the skeezy Carny, the creepy The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane, and the what-now?!? of Hotel Artemis.

But most of all, you have to have lived for that moment when Foster blows the hinges off the bar room door doin’ “My Name is Tallulah” in Bugsy Malone.

That’s the moment everyone in Videoville would come to a complete stop, look at each other, then look at me and be like, “What … am … I … watching???”

Movie magic, that’s what you’re watching.

A moment, a scene, a shard of cinematic history, captured thanks to Foster, and to the often-underrated, often-brilliant director Alan Parker, who passed away today at 76.

He gave us Midnight Express, Fame, Mississippi Burning, Pink Floyd: The Wall, Shoot the Moon and many, many more, but it’s Bugsy Malone I hold dearest.

That movie is just a huge part of my memories from my time at Videoville, a run in which it never felt like I was going to work.

I was paid to watch films, jabber on about movies, and play gems like Bugsy Malone for the customers – maybe entertaining them, maybe messin’ with them, a bit, maybe opening their eyes to something outside of just that week’s new releases.

The people who make the movies, the Jodie Foster’s and the Alan Parker’s, have had a huge impact on my life, and, for that, I am grateful.

“You give a little love and it all comes back to you, you’re gonna be remembered for the things that you say and do.”

And for the movies you make.

Thank you, Mr. Parker. You will be remembered.

 

My Name is Tallulah:

 

Bad Guys:

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