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Posts Tagged ‘Black Lives Matter’

A simple purchase can help a community.

Swing by the Kingfisher Bookstore today, while wearing a face mask and practicing strong social distancing skills, and help Coupeville Schools build a diverse, inclusive library of books.

But first, pop back up to the photo above to get all the info on the project.

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Coupeville grad Jazmine Franklin continues to take the art world by storm. (Photos courtesy Franklin)

It’s a win-win.

You can make a visible commitment to backing the Black Lives Matter movement, while supporting one of Coupeville’s most talented grads.

Jazmine Franklin was a student leader and standout two-sport athlete (tennis and cheer) during her days at CHS, and she continues to excel as an adult.

Her artwork is eye-catching, such as in the piece seen below.

A recent Franklin art work.

Franklin’s newest project is a series of Black Lives Matter designs, which can be ordered on t-shirts and hoodies.

She can also do custom items such as long sleeve shirts, tank tops, onesies, and toddler items upon request.

For orders or questions, contact Franklin at JZMNOriginals@gmail.com.

Three designs, one cause.

 

Current offerings:

T-shirts (Gildan200)
$15 each plus shipping

 

White lettering on:

Black
Maroon
Charcoal grey
Royal blue
Purple

 

Black lettering on:

Safety green (neon)
White
Hot pink

 

Hoodies (Gildan185)
$30 each plus shipping

 

White lettering on:
Black
Garnet (reddish maroon)
Charcoal grey
Royal blue
Purple

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The highway overpass in Coupeville. (Lori Taylor photo)

A former Coupeville High School student/athlete is organizing a Black Lives Matter Peaceful Protest this Saturday, June 27.

The event, planned by former Wolf soccer ace Dawson d’Almeida, begins at 10 AM at Coupeville Elementary.

The school sits in the heart of Coupeville at 6 S. Main Street.

With the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, masks are required for anyone who attends.

After meeting at the elementary school, marchers will discuss why they are there, then hold a silent vigil for eight minutes and 46 seconds in memory of George Floyd, a Black man killed in police custody in Minneapolis.

Following the vigil, marchers will walk through Coupeville.

Water and some signs will be provided, though marchers can also bring their own signs.

Event organizers ask marchers to reflect beforehand on why they intend to participate, and spend time learning about the best ways to peacefully protest and be a supporter of Black Lives Matter.

 

BLM resources:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/13O7yipKHeIF2-QJ_K9IKIdLQAlN8NgEOF62qQjUjEVM/edit?fbclid=IwAR0FnbzTEdXEU1pVoqKcTNmPH8TxjQdUr48cSAAW-EQVsOaSAmhOLSrdHKE

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Coupeville Schools Superintendent Steve King

The on-camera murder of George Floyd, a black man, by a white police officer in Minneapolis, has been the catalyst which sparked ongoing demonstrations across the world.

Coupeville Schools Superintendent Steve King released the following statement Friday morning:

 

Dear Coupeville Families and Staff,

Recently, I watched a video of another black person being killed in the streets by a police officer.

His name was George Floyd and he was murdered by a policeman.

It was completely inhumane the way this man was killed with the knee of the policeman pressed against his upper back and neck area laid face down on the streets.

This happened for several minutes and I heard the man saying over and over that he could not breathe and he became so desperate for his life he started to cry for his mother.

As I watched the video I had a mixture of feelings that included anger and compassion for Mr. Floyd.

Over the years I have lost track of the number of African Americans who have lost their lives in similar ways.

I have spent the last week trying to figure out how to step out of the safety of my own white, middle class world to use what influence I have to help change an American system that now has practiced generations of racism and inequality.

I, like many white Americans, have ignored this problem for years, choosing personal comforts, job security, and the risk of criticism over standing up and speaking out against injustice and racism in our country.

I now see that I represent so much of what is wrong in America right now.

For years, while feeling compassion on this issue, I have never courageously stood up for our people of color and especially our black Americans who have suffered systemic racism.

Guilt and compassion without action is effectively silence and makes me complicit in our horrible history of discrimination.

Minneapolis, Minnesota seems like a long way from Coupeville.

But I can tell you that racism and discrimination does exist in our community and in our schools.

To our students and families of color please accept my apology for not standing up stronger for you sooner.

I want you to know that while I am not sure how to do this, that I am committed to doing it. I share in your grief and your anger.

Some of you may feel hopeless after all these years and incidents.

I hope that you will be able to forgive me for my years of silence and cowardly choice to stay silent and safe.

It is time for us to start having difficult, messy, and uncomfortable conversations about this issue.

Our nation seems like a very dark place right now and it is hard to stay positive and have hope.

It is time for us to act in love for the injustices that we see. Guilt and compassion is simply not enough.

I understand if you do not want to join me in this work or even if you are critical of the message.

I myself have done the same thing to people and leaders who try to speak up on this topic.

Here are a few videos that I wanted to share with all of you about systemic racism in our countries and in our schools to help us begin to educate ourselves and to open up the discussion on this issue.

Sincerely,

Steve King, Superintendent

 

 

 

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When the boys in the Vegas print shop have no clue how to spell the name of the Washington state Island where you supposedly shoot your show…

We don’t talk much about The Whidbey Buzz these days.

A year into its existence, the internet “news” show is largely viewed as little more than a joke, five to six minutes of regurgitated press releases offered up twice a week by a winking anchorman who frequently stumbles over pronunciations and local geography.

Which isn’t all that odd, since the nattily-dressed Steve Schorr lives and works in Las Vegas, and has for decades.

He can prattle on all he wants about his broadcasts coming from “right here at home in Oak Harbor” and it won’t change the truth.

Schorr’s word stews are shot in front of a digital screen in Sin City, set to an opening musical intro remarkably like one I used to hear emit from my early-2000’s iMac.

That’s likely the work of Rick Manning at Rigel Studios, another past-his-prime Vegas lifer clinging to the last decade in which either man was relevant – the late ’80s.

Schorr himself has been on Whidbey at least once since The Whidbey Buzz reared its head online, timed to Scott Thompson, a former Vegas resident, trying desperately to save his constantly-floundering Wright’s Crossing development.

That appearance came at the Oak Harbor Best Western, during a melancholy meet and greet conducted in a windowless, downstairs, bunker-like room.

A small pot of coffee and a jug of water, offered by the hotel, was all that was on the menu, as Schorr and Thompson, who met in Vegas and made a connection over show dogs, talked over each other and tried to fire up a small crowd.

It was the first of many letdowns for The Buzz, which has promised, and failed to deliver, almost every time out, beginning with a pledge there would be cameras at the meet and greet, and footage would be used on-air.

There was not, and it was not.

After that, failed promises of transparency, of setting up a way for people not named Mr. Thompson to donate to the cause at People’s Bank, and of a plan to create a print edition of The Buzz.

Ten months down the road, it’s June 4, 2020, and still no account has been set up at People’s Bank.

As newspapers hemorrhage money and die left and right, seems very much like an idea which might have been cutting edge … back in the late ’80s.

But we’re not here today to just talk about the ways Schorr has fallen from the true faith.

Sure, he frequently slips PR about Thompson and his companies into his broadcasts, while violating the journalistic golden rule by never revealing his own ties with the builder.

Along the way Schorr gives prominent air time to political candidates Thompson financially backs, such as current Oak Harbor City Council member Jeff Mack and Island County Commissioner wannabe Dan Evans, feeding them softball questions.

Scott and wife Cynthia Thompson are the top two contributors to Dan Evans.

And then there’s the weirdo part, where Schorr keeps interjecting bits about Jefferson County recently, on a show supposedly shot on, and centered around, Whidbey, which is located in Island County.

Is Thompson also planning to foist his house projects on Port Townsend? Things that make you go hmmm…

But today I bring out the whuppin’ stick not to attack Schorr for being a PR man, but for the moment on Wednesday’s broadcast where he truly made the ghost of his supposed journalistic idol, Chet Huntley, spin in his grave.

On The Buzz website, Schorr claims he lives by the credo “give the story, state the facts, tell the who, what, where, when, how and why AND keep your opinion out of the story!”

And then, starting at the 2:27 mark of the video below, he takes a giant steaming dump on that credo.

Speaking from Vegas, where a police officer was shot during a protest, Schorr gravely informs us that here, in a place he barely knows, “Tension remains high on Whidbey Island and surrounding communities as protesting and rioting continues to take place in cities around the country.”

And then, in a moment which would make Huntley retch, Schorr, a man “concerned only with facts,” plays footage of riots in mainland cities — lifted from YouTube — while intoning:

“In communities within Whidbey Island, there have been a series of rumors that have sparked concerns, and, even in some cases, business owners becoming armed to protect their properties, but no actual large protests have occured.”

At which point, Steve Schorr’s entire journalistic career, much of it spent reading teleprompters as a Vegas talking head back in the day, withers and dies for the final time.

“A series of rumors?”

What are you, a 14-year-old girl?

Cause you definitely aren’t a credible newsman anymore.

I get it. You don’t live here, Mr. Schorr.

Most of your contact with Whidbey Island is limited to the handful of people who showed up for your meet and greet, such as your painfully obvious benefactor, Mr. Thompson.

Oh, and the tinfoil hat-wearing nutballs who hide out on the privacy-obsessed Whidbey Island Community United page, where they rant all day and night about liberal boogeymen a’comin’ to take away their ability to live as if the 1950’s had never ended.

Which is kind of odd, since the hardcore of the hardcore on that page were born long after that decade (and a lot of its ideas) passed into history.

People like Shannon Williams, an Oak Harbor grad whose tenure on the Island County Planning Commission was remarkably short after she opened by being refreshingly frank, and rather un-politician-like, letting everyone in earshot know exactly how she feels about the homeless.

Spoiler: She’s not a big fan.

Today she occupies herself by taking paparazzi pics of homeless and posting every 12 minutes, as Shannon RW, on multiple Facebook pages like WICU, SAFE Whidbey and the snappily-named Whidbey Island Looks Like Shit.

I’ll give her this. She’s dedicated.

Or Whidbey short-timers like Paul Rempa, (now hiding as Paul TR on Facebook) who enjoys harassing grandmothers whose family roots in Coupeville stretch back nearly to the first white settlers in the area.

I cropped out the photo of the grandma and grandkids, unlike the original poster.

Mr. Rempa is fond of telling any who disagree with him that “words matter.”

Which is really too bad, since the first words which come to mind when I think of Rempa are “stolen honor.”

Screenshot from Paul Rempa’s Facebook, taken 10:30 AM, June 4, 2020.

Take a look at the screenshot, read the date and time, and then listen to command at Central Whidbey Island Fire and Rescue, who had this to say way back in October, 2019.

Hanging on to the fumes of past glory? Seems to be a reoccurring theme in these here parts.

So you sit poolside in the 105-degree heat of Sin City, Mr. Schorr (please use some sunscreen, sir), and you “hear rumors” from a nutball brigade fond of sniffing the farts of Tim “Chair Thief Boy” Eyman, and then you pass it off as “journalism.”

Antifa is coming to the suburbs! Oak Harbor is in full-on Mad Max mode!! COVID-19 is being smuggled in by the homeless!!!!!

Now, if you actually lived here, on this Island where it’s going to top out in the low 60’s today, you could have seen with your own eyes that yes, there was a Black Lives Matter protest this weekend in Oak Harbor, notable for a decided lack of “tension.”

Show me one photo of Whidbey business owners armed, camped out, expecting an assault on their stores.

Curious as to how not a single image of this type has surfaced on any form of social media this week.

But you don’t live here, do you? And you don’t have any real idea of what happens here, do you?

You just camp out here virtually, using the siren call of the internet as you steadily chip away at whatever remains of your tattered journalistic legacy.

It’s long past time for you to call it a day, Mr. Schorr.

Walk away from Mr. Thompson’s probably doomed housing development, and stop trying to prop up the fear and paranoia of a handful of nutballs, sir.

End The Buzz with some grace and go bask in the afterglow of good memories crafted in your hometown.

They think you’re a swell dude in Vegas — even named a school for you — and you can still accomplish good in Sin City.

Especially if they don’t learn about your willingness to pimp your soul on the internet.

Relaunch your real web show, Under The Vegas Sun. You looked happy on that show.

But do it soon, sir.

Chet Huntley is tired of spinning in his grave.

“Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency?”

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