Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Hawaii’

Dolores and Dave Engle. (All photos courtesy Engle family)

Dolores Engle was my friend.

And, if she knew you, she was your friend, too, because she had the kind of heart and soul where she made friends fast and kept them forever.

She and her husband Dave, who’s pretty darn friendly himself, have had an immeasurable impact on our community over the years.

When I inducted the duo into the Coupeville Sports Hall o’ Fame, they went in as the “Mom and Dad of Wolf Nation,” and the description fits perfectly.

Dolores will be greatly missed, but her deeds, her rock-solid belief in her faith, and her enduring kindness remain.

She was our friend, and will always be.

 

From her family:

Dolores Leilani (Harper) Engle of Coupeville passed away in Bothell, WA on February 5, 2021, surrounded by her family.

Dolores was born on December 18, 1938 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

As the oldest child of a Navy family, she moved many times in her early life — including Texas, Virginia, Rhode Island, Florida, and California — before moving to Coupeville in 1951.

She was part of the high school drill team, as well as many other clubs.

She graduated from Coupeville High School in 1956 and moved to help on her parents’ farm in Eltopia, WA, where she also attended business college and worked at the Water District Farm Bureau Office.

Dolores and David Engle were married in Coupeville on June 20th, 1959.

They began married life in Puyallup, WA, where Dolores worked for a car dealership and school district, the first of many bookkeeping and office manager jobs throughout her career.

In 1968, Dolores and Dave moved back to Coupeville, where she worked at Dean’s Chevrolet, right across from Prairie Center.

In 1976 they moved to Anaheim, CA, where she entered full-time ministry as a pastor’s wife and church secretary at Plaza Bible Church.

In 1992, they moved back to Coupeville, where they have lived ever since.

Wherever she lived, Dolores was always very involved with the church — teaching Sunday school and Bible study, organizing children’s church and church bulletin boards, running the snack distribution at Vacation Bible School, as well as singing in various choirs, including the Billy Graham crusade choirs.

Dolores was known for her gentleness and big hugs, and her signature greeting, “Good Morning,” regardless of the time of day.

She was an accomplished and creative seamstress who was able to create made to order wedding, prom, homecoming and other formal dresses.

Not only could she sew, but she also crocheted intricate patterns into doilies, cross-stitched tapestries, knitted baby blankets and sweaters, and could make any costume requested out of home-goods on hand.

Dolores made these vintage cheerleader skirts for athletes coached by her daughter Sylvia.

Dolores was a voting poll site coordinator/registrar and loved volunteering her time to help secure voting booths.

She made family dinners and church potlucks festive with pies, banana and zucchini breads, snickerdoodles, casseroles, and her signature blackberry jam for rolls, along with her gigantic, yummy salads.

She loved reading, puzzles, crosswords, and word searches.

Dolores was quite mechanically-minded and able to fix or build most projects. The kids all knew to ask Mom — not Dad — for help when building all things!

Dolores enjoyed traveling to see family each summer — to take care of new-born grandchildren, see the Holy Lands in Israel, explore the state of Alaska, have tea in London and see the crown jewels; and to Disneyland (countless times) with all of her grandkids, where she patiently volunteered to take the youngest (whomever it was at that time) on their favorite ride over and over while the older children raced around.

Grandma always had time for her grandbabies.

Retirement was not in her vocabulary as she kept busy making breakfast for the worship team (French toast casserole, anyone?), last minute alterations for anyone in sewing distress, caring for grandchildren by babysitting or driving them to and from activities, taking lead on Dave’s recoveries from various surgeries, maintaining household chores, attending Coupeville and Orange Lutheran High School events, cheering on grandkids at little league games in Bothell, donating/volunteering/supporting at local theater events, and also keeping up with friends from near and far through phone calls, letters, or notes.

Even as dementia progressed, and Alzheimer’s took hold, Dolores’s delight in being around her family and interacting with her grandchildren created bright and lasting memories in her final days.

Dolores’s life was defined by a deep faith in her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, and she shared his love with everyone she met.

Dolores was preceded in death by her parents, Jack and Jewel (Johnston) Harper and her brothers, Curtis and Charles.

Dolores is survived by her husband, David Engle; daughters, Sylvia (Engle) Arnold, Shannon (Engle) Arnold, Stephanie (Engle) Penrod and Sarah (Engle) Viers; sons-in-law, Garrett Arnold, Lance Arnold, Isaiah Penrod, and Tim Viers; ten grandchildren, Scott Arnold, Courtney (Arnold) Sleister, Brett Arnold, Luke Arnold, Jacob Arnold, Victoria Penrod, Andrew Penrod, Noelle Viers, Lyal Viers, and Reagan Viers; two great-grandchildren, Maddison Arnold and Maximus Sleister (and another baby girl expected in April); sister, Pamela Blevins; and sister-in-law, Charlotte Harper; and numerous nephews and nieces.

A memorial service will be held privately due to pandemic restrictions.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Wounded Warrior Project: woundedwarriorproject.org or The Gideons International: gideons.org.

The Mom and Dad of Wolf Nation, with their real-life daughters.

Read Full Post »

Coupeville’s Tony Killgo, a two-sport star in the ’80s, lives with wife Karen in Hawaii. (Photos courtesy Killgo)

Killgo hard at work as an underwater welder.

Thirty-three years after graduation and still a CHS record-holder.

He’s gone, but far from forgotten.

Tony Killgo calls Hawaii home these days, but the Coupeville High School grad still looms large on the school’s track and field record board, sharing in one of the longest-standing records in program history.

During his senior season in 1986, the standout two-sport athlete went out with a bang, teaming up with Jay Roberts, Rick Alexander, and Bill Carstensen to break the boys 4 x 100 record.

After claiming 3rd at the state meet in the event, the pack broke up and went their separate ways. But the record they left behind has lingered, remaining untouched now for 33 years.

Only Natasha Bamberger’s marks in the 1600 and 3200, set in 1984, have endured longer on the Wolf record board.

Three-plus decades later, the memories of that dream season remain vibrant for Killgo.

“I received four letters in football and track, as well as individual awards in both track and football,” he said. “But I’d have to say if there was a year that stuck out, it would most definitely be the year our relay team captured lightning in a baton.

“It was a great moment to be a part of,” Killgo added. “Our friendships and camaraderie were in perfect sync for our relay team.

“I have to say I’m very proud to be a part of that magic us four got to experience; I will always cherish that time and our memories.”

While track is where his legend has lingered the longest, it was the gridiron that probably captivated Killgo the most.

“I’d have to say football was my favorite sport,” he said. “And I don’t know that I necessarily have favorite games as much as I have memorable plays, and moments of teammates making the impossible, possible, with great plays I remember to this day.”

The player who looms largest for Killgo is his older brother, Paul, another Wolf legend whose exploits are still discussed.

“Although we didn’t run together that year, or play football that year together, I always strived and yearned to be as good as him in both sports,” Tony Killgo said. “Those who remember seeing him play in both track and football will attest he was something to watch.

“And just knowing that he was watching me, pushed me to my limits to be the best I could, not just in school, not just in sports, but in life.”

Their father also “never missed a game or a track meet,” something which has always stayed with Killgo.

It was that kind of support, both from his own family, and from the families of other CHS athletes and students, which made playing in Coupeville special.

“The memories I remember the most were before the games and the meets, the moms and the dads of the participants getting together and enjoying the upcoming meet or game,” Killgo said.

“Parents like Diane Bailey and the Marti family and Mr. Aparicio, as well as one of my favorites, Mr. Ford.”

Supporting both their own children and the offspring of their neighbors made for a tight-knit community.

“You see, those are the memories I remember — bringing our families, loved ones, moms and dads together on one night or one special occasion,” Killgo said. “We brought them together to enjoy each other’s company and camaraderie as well.

“A moment where they could smile, laugh, and enjoy each other’s company and forget about the complexities of life, like bills, obligations, and family stresses,” he added. “I’d have to say these are the memories I remember the most — bringing a community together.”

While he no longer sees most of his high school mates on a regular basis, Killgo hopes that when his former teammates and fans think about him, they do so with a smile.

“I’d like to hope they remember me as somebody who had good school spirit,” he said. “And someone who always tried to represent his family and community the best he knew how.”

As he’s traveled through life after high school, Killgo has used many of the lessons he learned as a teenage athlete in his adult life.

That’s something he hopes the current generation of Wolf sports stars embraces.

“I learned to win with grace, but, most importantly, how to lose with grace,” Killgo said. “Winning and losing in life is a special thing to learn from.

“You see, at that time we didn’t have participation trophies, you either sank or swam, won or lost.

“Playing both football and track taught me the importance of teamwork and it’s reflected in my business today,” he added. “I don’t have any employees, I only have coworkers, as we are all a team pushing towards the same goal.”

These days, Killgo is a certified commercial diver specializing in underwater demolitions and welding, and his business takes him bouncing between the Hawaiian islands.

He and wife Karen worked together, but her career came to an unexpected end when she was injured and contracted a rare, non-contagious disease – Complex Regional Pain Syndrome/Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (CRPS/RSD).

There are estimates of 50,000 new cases each year in the United States, with those affected experiencing intense pain in limbs, hands, and feet, as well as changes in skin color, temperature, and loss of movement or function.

Pain is constant for most with the syndrome, and doctors worldwide have been unable so far to solve the cause of CRPS/RSD.

As the couple have dealt with the disease, they have tried to use what they’ve learned in a positive manner.

“My wife’s constant battle kind of puts life in perspective,” Killgo said. “To have sympathy and help others when we can.”

With a new school year about to star, Coupeville High School’s athletic fields and gyms will be full of Wolf athletes, some seasoned, some making their debuts in the red and black.

However their prep careers play out, Killgo hopes that everyone in a CHS uniform takes every moment in, that they embrace the chance to play, and set themselves up to look back with as much fondness as he now does.

“My only advice to the next crop of athletes and students is to just enjoy life,” he said. “Enjoy your friendships and camaraderie, but most of all your family and your community.

“Because, when you’re gone those are the things you remember the most,” Killgo added. “Not awards, not teams, but the small moments that make you who you are later, down-the-line in life.”

Read Full Post »

Alana Mihill has it made in the shade. (Susan Hulst photo)

Alana Mihill is a quiet assassin.

The Coupeville 7th grader doesn’t waste her time chattering away but simply goes out and gets the job done.

The younger sister of CHS soccer star Laurence Boado, she played basketball and competed in track and field during her first year of middle school sports.

Mihill, who was born in Hawaii but moved to Coupeville when she was two, competed in a number of events this spring.

She ran the 200 and 800, threw the javelin and carried the baton as a member of the Wolves 4 x 400 relay unit.

A fan of her science and gym classes (“My favorite is gym because we don’t have to sit the whole time”), she enjoys spending time taking her dog for walks.

Mihill hails CMS track coaches Elizabeth Bitting and Jon Gabelein for their inspiration, and enjoys both of her sports for allowing her to “be active and have fun.”

Whether playing hoops or competing on the oval, she keeps chugging away like the Energizer Rabbit.

“My strength is endurance,” Mihill said. “And I would like to work on my speed.”

The team aspect of basketball gives it a slight edge over the often solo lifestyle of a track athlete when she picks her favorite sport.

“Basketball, because there is less individual pressure,” Mihill said. “I would like to continue in basketball and work on shooting baskets.”

Read Full Post »

Coleby Fleming, 'merican.

Coleby Fleming

Coleby Fleming is many things.

Coupeville High School student. Former Wolf football player. Die-hard Pittsburgh Steelers fan.

To that list you can add accomplished photographer.

He’s been snapping away for some time now, but recently took a big step into the great wide open with some aerial photography while on a trip to Hawaii.

The results can be seen in the video below:

Read Full Post »