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Posts Tagged ‘volleyball’

After two years of running with South Whidbey, Danny Conlisk will help Coupeville relaunch its own in-school cross country program this fall. (Dawnelle Conlisk photo)

Paper work first.

If you’re planning on playing a sport or participating in an activity this fall for Coupeville High School or Middle School, you need to visit the high school office Tuesday, Aug. 14 between noon-6 PM and get registered.

This is the time to pay fees and fill out paperwork, NOT get physicals. But, if you don’t have a current one of those, get scramblin’.

CHS offers volleyball, football, boys tennis, girls soccer, cheer and cross country in the fall. The harrier program is returning to the school after a two-decade absence.

The middle school is also relaunching cross country, in addition to offering volleyball and football.

For more info, contact Eileen Stone at estone@coupeville.k12.wa.us or Lisa Yoder at lyoder@coupeville.k12.wa.us.

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Amy King first coached Makana Stone in middle school volleyball. “She was all about team and doing her best, even then.” (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Mckenzie Meyer (front) played many sports, but unfortunately never landed on a high school team coached by King.

I’ve worked with a lot of coaches, but found only one thinking of doing a post-game write-up in poetry form.

Amy King, who has worked with the Wolf volleyball, softball and basketball programs, could be doing a bang-up job writing her own blog.

You know, if she wasn’t already busy with coaching, her real-world job, family life and the million other things she accomplishes while I’m still trying to wake up.

On the road or at home, win or loss, she always delivers crisp info, filled with insight, and this time is no different.

Coupeville’s third-longest tenured coach (trailing just Randy King and Ken Stange), she arrives today to break down the best Wolf players she’s worked with.

So, let me step away and give her the floor.

Aside from being a little busy, I’ve been mulling things over in my head – so many players!

Plus it’s tough coming in from the JV side of things too – many of my people and thoughts matched (husband) David’s.

Best player I’ve coached is, of course, Makana Stone. I echo everything David said about her.

Of course my first experience was the one year she played 8th grade volleyball.

She and Miranda Engle went to camp and when she hit the floor it was all so natural that it was like she had played her whole life.

Great attitude and all about team and doing her best even then.

Which athlete do I wish I could have coached? This is a tough one; I’m thinking McKenzie Meyer.

She ended up being our manager in middle school volleyball, but helped out when we had odd numbers.

She studied what was being shown and just came out and performed during practices. She is very athletic and had better skills than some of the girls who were out there playing.

When it came to high school I had high hopes she would join a team I was coaching.

Most underrated athlete I’ve coached – I have two on this one.

A lot of this comes from who you are playing with — you have those athletes like Lexie or Brittany Black, who stand out, so others are important to the success of a team, but did not always get the glory.

These two didn’t really care about the glory though.

Shawna West and Vanessa Davis are my two.

Both were posts and played hard. They worked hard and were no-nonsense types of players.

Shawna was our original bull in the china shop player. She rarely talked off the court, but her game said it all.

Vanessa was the same; stronger than she might have looked, shy and didn’t talk a whole lot, but without her game, the team would not have gone as far as they did.

Characteristics/intangibles/commitment is by far the easiest question, answered the same as my husband –Breeanna Messner.

She was in the first group of kids I coached in Coupeville, 7th grade volleyball.

Coached her since then in multiple sports, it was all the same. Dedication, hard working, great attitude and the kind of athlete any coach would be happy to have on their team.

Regardless of the sport or who was coaching; she would change positions without question; play where needed.

She was involved in all off-season functions she could participate in and always helped pick up gear; set up gear and never brought or fed into drama.

She had that no-quit attitude, fight and desire in everything she did.

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It don’t mean a thing if the paint ain’t got that zing. (Photo courtesy Amy King)

We’re going back to when you could smell the paint fumes.

Today’s Throwback Thursday photo captures a moment in time when Wolf athletes went the extra mile for their classmates, adding a colorful zing to the cheering section.

PS, the first home Coupeville High School volleyball match of the new fall sports season is just six weeks away — Thursday, Sept. 6 against Friday Harbor.

So, the challenge is out there, Wolf fans.

Who among you is ready to get artistic and go back to the future?

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Ella Colwell, a volleyball, basketball and track star, enters Coupeville High School as a freshman this fall. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Colwell sinks a free throw during a summer hoops camp. (Photo courtesy Megan Wise)

Sports often build friendship.

That’s true for Ella Colwell, a three-sport star heading to Coupeville High School as a freshman this fall.

During her middle school days, she played volleyball and basketball, while rounding out the year with track and field.

Staying active and involved on a daily basis has paid off for Colwell.

“Being a part of something (is great),” she said. “It helps you find people that you maybe didn’t think you’d be friends with.”

While Colwell enjoys all of her sports, hard-court life is the life for her.

“My favorite sport is basketball, because I like how you can be aggressive in it and also I love how much of a team sport it is,” she said. “You really can’t have a successful team if you don’t work together.”

Colwell and her hoops teams, both in middle school and SWISH, have been winners, bringing home titles as they build a tight-knit bond.

A tall, strong athlete who could likely develop into a fearsome inside enforcer in the paint, she’s ready for the challenge.

“My strengths as an athlete would be someone who you can look for as help,” Colwell said.

“Like, in basketball, I’m a post/defender, so when a teammate needs help getting around their defender, I might go up and screen them, or yell “defender on your left” or “watch for screens.”

A strong math student (“it’s my favorite, because I love the satisfaction of when you’ve been trying to solve this hard question, and you finally get it right”), Colwell enjoys watching action/thriller flicks in her spare time.

“Movies that get your heart pumping,” she said. “And have you on the edge of your seat, waiting to see what happens next!”

But when it’s time to head to practice or games, Colwell is as committed as they come.

“My goals for my high school sports career would definitely be to make it on the varsity for basketball,” she said. “And to become a better overall volleyball player.”

Regardless of the sport or activity, she knows her biggest fan, mom Megan, will always be there for her.

“My mom has been a big impact because she was the one who first told me to play basketball,” Colwell said. “Actually, at first, I didn’t even want to play, but I’m glad I did, because it is my favorite sport.”

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Wolf spikers put in a lot of work, and reaped a lot of benefits, at a four-day camp at Western Washington University. (Photo courtesy Cory Whitmore)

Having tasted big-time success, they want more.

Coming off the program’s first trip to the state tourney in more than a decade, Coupeville High School volleyball players want to keep the good times rolling.

While the Wolves lost seven seniors and jump into a new league this fall, the North Sound Conference, there is still talent to burn.

And, even better, those players who will be the heart of the team, are deeply committed.

CHS coach Cory Whitmore and 11 of his players spent the 4th of July holiday putting in work, refining skills, bonding as teammates and preparing for the season ahead.

Whitmore’s report from the front line:

We had a very strong and productive camp at Western Washington University this past week (July 4-7th).

Year-after-year, the coaches, staff and players of WWU put on a phenomenal camp for athletes of all skills levels and classifications.

Teams are pushed through rigorous individuals position drills, focused team games and practices and special attention from top level college coaches.

One of the facets about this camp that draws us every year is not only the level of intensity of various skills and tournament play, but also WWU’s emphasis on the “overall game.”

This includes a session with the team’s sports psychologist, a goal-setting session, and many different team mini-challenges.

These aspects of the game are crucial to the success of a team in season and few have better team chemistry and cohesion than WWU.

This group was a fun and eager group to travel with and watch grow over the course of four tiring days.

Ashley Menges was voted as a team captain at the end of Wolves Skills Camp in June and did a fantastic job of guiding the team through.

Emma Smith is taking on a heavier load, both physically receiving a strong number of sets at her position as well as becoming a vocal leader for the team.

Both seniors have the most experience and are very inclusive to their younger teammates.

I am really proud of this team’s versatility – team camp is a great time to try different lineups, different offensive and defensive systems and their ability to adapt as a unit was very impressive and encouraging to me as a coach looking forward to the 2018 season.

Sophomore Chelsea Prescott played two different positions over the course of camp and showed her ability to handle a variety of responsibilities and being her first time to this camp, this was especially promising.

Maya Toomey-Stout has worked incredibly hard in the off-season and received the coaches award from our WWU coach – she received accolades for her ability to play a six-rotation and fly around the court, no matter the fatigue or the drill.

Emma Mathusek, Lucy Sandahl, Raven and Willow Vick all played and worked incredibly hard at team camp – camp is a great chance for players to showcase their hard work from the off-season and begin to develop their role and responsibilities on the team.

Zoe Trujillo went down with an ankle injury on the first day, which was rough for her and the team, but she of course remained positive and contributed whenever possible (goal setting, team discussions, mini-challenges, etc.). She should be back at 100% come August.

Before having to leave, Scout Smith and Hannah Davidson too worked very hard and improved upon their respective positions – both received impressed comments from the players and coaches at WWU.

Overall, team camp was exactly was we needed it to be.

Losing seven strong seniors always leaves a large number of “question marks” up in the air. But this camp helped to answer some and challenge players to rise to the occasion presented before them.

This group works very hard and well together. They know the challenges that lay ahead and have great attitudes toward them.

I’m really looking forward to the fall season after a very strong showing this off-season.

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