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Posts Tagged ‘track and field’

Andrew Martin, destroyer of worlds. (Photos by JohnsPhotos.net)

One giant walking, talking bruise with an undying love for IHop pancakes.

Some football players try and do things with finesse, try and run away from their rivals, try to keep their uniforms clean.

Andrew Martin was never, ever one of those players.

“Hambone” is what you get if you build a time machine, go back to the ’50s, grab the guy who’s covered in mud and grass chunks, the guy everyone else is trying not to be hit by, then bring that dude back to modern times.

In other words, a new-school player with an old-school mind set.

Martin rarely dodged, always choosing to run right through fools instead, whether he was playing offense or defense for the Coupeville High School football team.

Hand him the ball, and the human battering ram often ran over the top of his own blockers, surging into the crowd, tearing off chunks of yardage (and sometimes ripping off opponent’s arms and legs in the process).

Martin bulldozes a would-be tackler.

Even in the open field, with no one in front of him, Martin sometimes pivoted backwards, seemingly just so he could feel the thwack one more time as he obliterated a would-be tackler.

He got in the end zone a fair amount of times, especially in big games, but all his best runs, all the plays which linger after his prep career has ended, involved slo-mo destruction.

The same was true on the defensive side of the ball, where Martin recorded tackles at a much more impressive pace than stat guys often recorded.

Rumbling from his linebacker position, or anywhere Wolf coaches plugged him into to as they employed various schemes, he was a wall of bricks.

Few got past him, no one got through him, and virtually everyone who wandered through Martin’s air space paid for it with a deep, aching burn down in their nether regions the next day.

He was a wrecker, a rumbler, a glorious throwback to a time when football players knew only one way to play the game — all-out, aggressive, and loaded for bear on every play.

Martin rose to the occasion, never more than on the night last fall when CHS football sealed the deal on its first winning season in 13 years.

Playing against 2A Anacortes, the Wolf senior rumbled for all three Coupeville touchdowns during a 27-carry, 137-yard swan song in front of his home fans.

Want to marinate in the moment one more time? Pop over to:

https://coupevillesports.com/2019/10/25/long-time-coming/

During Martin’s final season, I travelled to the team’s road games with Andy’s parents, and saw a different side to him than I might otherwise have.

After the Friday Night Lights had dimmed, after the roar of the crowd had receded, Andy would hobble back to the car, the effects of his playing style evident in how he moved, and in his good-natured description of all his various aches, pains, and injuries.

Yet, he never stopped moving forward. On the field, and in life.

Whether he was arguing for why he deserved post-game KFC, even if the nearest chicken outlet was way off the highway, breaking down every play from the game just ended, or trash-talking (in private) an opposing team player who tried (and failed) to intimidate him, Andy was a quality traveling companion.

I respect his game, appreciate the passion and grit he played with, and always found him to be quietly hilarious.

“Rest easy, little guy. Daddy will get you to the end zone and won’t let those bad men touch you.”

Off the field, the youngest member of the Martin clan was a strong student, and a talented member of the CHS band.

He also had some quality moments for the Wolf track and field squad, and could have been a beast on the basketball court like dad Jonathan, if he hadn’t needed downtime to heal his myriad football injuries.

But Andy made his mark on the gridiron, and jammed into the back of a car on the way home from games in some far-flung outpost, and that’s more than enough.

Today, his exploits, his fire, the way he lived, breathed, and (sometimes) suffered for football carry him into the Coupeville Sports Hall o’ Fame.

After this, you’ll find him, along with older brother Jacob, hanging out at the top of the blog, up under the Legends tab.

Bring him some KFC, sit back, and let him tell you in vivid detail what REALLY happened down there on the field, under the dog pile, away from the eyes of the ref.

Can’t write about it all, maybe, but it still makes for a heck of a story.

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The man, the myth, the legend – Larrie Ford. (Photo courtesy David Ford)

Coupeville lost one of its best coaches, and people, this week, with the passing of Larrie Ford.

The following is from his family:

 

It saddens us to announce the passing of our beloved father Larrie Leon Ford on Monday, July 13, 2020, in Coupeville, Washington.

Larrie was born June 13, 1942 in Wapato, Washington to parents Clifton Ford and Majorie Shinaberger.

Larrie grew up in Camas, Washington riding his beloved horse Chico.

He competed on the rodeo circuit, winning many trophies and ribbons, in bull riding and tie-down roping.

While in high school Larrie held several Washington state track and field records that he was very proud of, which stood for 50 years!

Back in the CHS gym, Larrie enjoys some quality time with Greg White. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

In 1962 he enlisted into the U.S. Navy, as an Aviation Ordanceman (IYAOYAS).

He served his country with dedication and pride from Vietnam to N.A.S. Whidbey Island, where he spent most of his Naval career. He retired with honors in 1982.

On August 4th, 1977, Larrie married the love of his life, Janice L. Wilson.

Jan called him her “Knight In Shining Armor.”

They had a wonderful 30-year marriage full of adventures and raising their six children together.

Larrie enjoyed many years as a coach and advisor for Coupeville High School.

Larrie gets ready for a Homecoming parade with Dr. Jim Shank (middle) and Dale Sherman. (Photo by Shelli Trumbull)

He was a competitive shooter and served as President of the Central Whidbey Sportsman Association.

Our dad loved fishing and could be found at his “secret spot” on Cranberry Lake with his family and cherished dog Barkley.

Larrie was also a member of The Oak Harbor Yacht Club, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Moose Lodge, and Coupeville Booster Club.

Larrie was preceded in death by his sister, Nola Ford Restorff, brother Denny Ford, and his wife, Janice L. Ford.

When Jan passed he gave her half of his heart to hold until he could be with her again.

He is survived by son James Ford and wife Francis, daughter Deanna Ford, son David Ford and wife Barbi, daughter Tina Ford, son Tony Ford and wife Kara, and son Eric Ford and wife Holly.

That includes nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

A private service with full military honors will be held to celebrate Larrie’s life.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in memory of Larrie Ford to the Coupeville Booster Club, PO Box 452, Coupeville, WA 98239, to continue his support to the youth of our community.

The family is especially grateful to those that have reached out and shared their love and stories of our father!

He was a great man!

Larrie with two of his six children, sons Tony (left) and David.

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Ja’Tarya Hoskins went to the state meet in both cheer and track during her time at Coupeville High School. (Photos by JohnsPhotos.net)

Hoskins teamed with (left to right) Maya Toomey-Stout, Mallory Kortuem, and Lindsey Roberts to smash the CHS record in the 4 x 100.

Brilliant and talented, Ja’Tarya Hoskins can clear any hurdle you throw at her.

The recent Coupeville High School grad, a standout for Wolf cheer and track teams, will head off the Island in the fall to continue her academic and athletic pursuits.

Hoskins plans to attend Saint Martin’s University in Lacey, and will balance studying pre-law with competing for the school’s track team.

The plan is to have her run the 60 meter hurdles during the indoor season, then move on to the 100 hurdles and possibly 400 hurdles when the outdoor season begins.

With a goal of attending law school after she finishes her undergraduate degree, Hoskins chose her new school after careful deliberation.

“I selected Saint Martin’s University because it’s a smaller school kinda like Coupeville,” she said.

“I haven’t visited the campus but looking at the photos it feels like home.”

Saint Martin’s is a private liberal arts school founded in 1895 by monks from the Benedictine Order.

Started as an all-boys boarding school, it first welcomed female students in 1965.

Hoskins joins a track and field team which vies in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference, the same league her fellow CHS Class of 2020 grad and relay teammate Mallory Kortuem will call home while running in the 400 at Western Washington University.

Saint Martin’s athletic programs compete at the NCAA D-II level.

During her time in Coupeville, Hoskins advanced to the highest level of competition in both of her sports.

As a junior, she was a key part of a CHS cheer squad which claimed 3rd place at the state meet.

That was especially notable, as the Wolves abandoned competition cheer after the 2011 season, working as just a sideline squad for six years before returning to the blue mats in 2018.

Buoyed by their immediate success, Hoskins and her teammates went on to qualify for nationals during her senior season.

In the track world, Ja’Tarya, part of a family of successful Wolf track stars which includes older siblings Will and Jai’Lysa, and younger sister Ja’Kenya, competed in almost every event on the list.

The COVID-19 pandemic denied her a senior track season, but as a junior she teamed with Kortuem, Maya Toomey-Stout, and Lindsey Roberts to place 5th at state in the 4 x 100 relay.

The quartet hit the tape in 50.54 seconds, and they currently sit on the big board in the CHS gym as school record-holders.

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After a standout career at Coupeville High School on the soccer pitch and track oval, Mallory Kortuem will run in college, as well. (Photos by JohnsPhotos.net)

In a non-pandemic world, Mallory Kortuem would be running for a state title next weekend.

The Coupeville High School senior, who holds four school track and field records, finished 2nd in the 400 last spring and would have been the odds-on favorite to wear the 1A girls crown this year.

While schools being shut down by COVID-19 prevented her from making a triumphant return to Eastern Washington, it’s not the end of Kortuem’s track career, however.

She has signed a letter of intent to run for Western Washington University, an NCAA D-II school, and will receive a partial scholarship.

The Vikings compete out of the 11-school Great Northwest Athletic Conference, which also includes Central Washington University and Seattle Pacific University.

Kortuem knows she’ll be running in the 400 for WWU, which has indoor and outdoor track seasons. After that, things are wide open.

“I am planning on trying the 200 as well, and I might be put on a 4 x 400 team,” she said.

“I have also been interested in trying the 800, which I would have tried this year, but I did not get the chance,” Kortuem added. “All I know for sure by the coaches is the 400.”

Mom Heather smooches the youngest of her three superstar children.

In between practices and meets, the Coupeville Sports Hall o’ Famer will study kinesiology, and may go into graduate school after her time at Western.

During her time at CHS, Kortuem was a standout soccer player as well as track and field star.

She departs holding school records in the 400 (58.02) and pole vault (8-10), while also being part of record-setting 4 x 100 (50.54) and 4 x 200 (1:46.13) relay squads, with all of those marks set during her junior campaign.

Kortuem earned four state meet medals through her junior season, one of just seven girls in CHS history to reach that mark since the school opened in 1900.

A college track career begins with putting pen to paper on your letter of intent. (Photo courtesy Kortuem)

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Coupeville High School will honor spring athletes such as Raven Vick (left) and Megan Behan next week. (Brian Vick photo)

Coupeville High School will award letters to many of its spring athletes, even though the COVID-19 pandemic erased the season.

That was the word Wednesday from Wolf Athletic Director Willie Smith, as he laid out a plan to honor those who would have been playing.

All seniors, and all returning underclassmen letter winners will letter, while all other CHS athletes will receive certificates of participation.

“Our coaches, whom I believe have huge hearts for kids, had a very good discussion about how we can honor our spring athletes as well as honor our goals of making lettering mean something,” Smith said.

The decision was made after reviewing what other schools and districts were doing to address the situation.

“Our logic behind this decision was to honor our seniors because they, of all the athletes participating, lost the most with the cancellation of the spring season,” Smith said.

“We didn’t feel it minimized the lettering process but did reward our seniors for something that was out of all our control and was the least we could do to help alleviate at least a small part of the disappointment.

“Secondly, rather than have our coaches try to determine who would or wouldn’t letter this year, we felt using last year as a barometer for lettering our underclassman was the most fair way to do this.

“We understand there is no perfect way to do this but we felt that we could honor our athletes this way, give our seniors a little positive out of all of this, and also allow those that lettered last year to be able to do it this year.

“Again, not perfect, not ideal, but we felt it was right for our kids and programs.”

Smith has set up a schedule for May 26-29 for athletes to come to the CHS gym lobby to return uniforms, pick up team pictures, and receive their letters or certificates.

 

Girls Tennis — Tuesday, May 26 @ 2:00
Boys Soccer — Wednesday, May 27 @ 3:00
Track and Field — Wednesday, May 27 @ 3:00
Softball — Thursday, May 28 @ 3:00
Baseball — Friday, May 29 @ 1:00

 

If athletes or parents have questions, they’re asked to contact their head coaches:

Baseball — Chris Smith — csmith@coupeville.k12.wa.us
Boys Soccer — Kyle Nelson — knelson@coupeville.k12.wa.us
Girls Tennis — Ken Stange — kstange@coupeville.k12.wa.us
Softball — Kevin McGranahan — kmcgranahan@coupeville.k12.wa.us
Track and Field — Randy King — rking@coupeville.k12.wa.us

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