Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Makana Stone’

Makana Stone, forever a force of nature. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Every bucket, every rebound, every moment of on-court brilliance built to this.

Two days after graduating from Whitman College, Coupeville’s Makana Stone received her school’s highest athletic honor Tuesday morning.

The former Wolf, who finished as the #5 scorer and #2 rebounder in Blues women’s basketball history, received the Mignon Borleske Award.

The honor recognizes a graduating senior student-athlete for “their career athletic ability and accomplishments, leadership and sportsmanship qualities, and contributions to the campus and community as a whole.”

Stone shared the honor with Blues tennis player Andrea Gu, a three-time All-American.

Robert Colton, a Whitman men’s basketball star, received the R.V. Borleske Award, which is given to the school’s top male athlete.

The winners receive a plaque, while their names are added to a display in the athletic department’s Hall of Fame.

The awards are named for a couple who arrived on campus in 1915, then had a huge impact on the growth of the school.

Raymond Borleske, a former Whitman football and baseball player, became a long-time coach, while Mignon Borleske taught dance and women’s education classes at the school for nearly 40 years.

Stone, a 2016 CHS grad, became a starter for the Blues midway through her freshman season, and rarely left the court after that.

She finished with the most starts (92) in program history, and she and fellow seniors Mady Burdett, Lily Gustafson, Natalie Whitesel, and Katie Stahl compiled a 94-20 record during their time in Walla Walla.

That was the most wins for a graduating class in the long and prestigious history of Whitman women’s basketball.

Their success included three trips to the NCAA D-III national tourney, and Whitman was hours away from playing in the Sweet 16 at this year’s event when COVID-19 shut down collegiate athletics.

Stone finished her run in a Blues uniform with 1,337 points and 837 rebounds.

She was named the Northwest Conference MVP as a senior, was selected for the Beyond Sports Women’s Collegiate All-Star Game, and received All-Region and All-American honors.

When she wasn’t excelling on the hardwood, Stone participated in the Whitman College mentor program, was an ACE representative, and served as a member of the Whitman Elementary School Science Night Committee.

Using her time well, Coupeville’s progeny was also a presenter at the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, while obtaining multiple internships.

Read Full Post »

Coupeville’s Makana Stone had a very-successful four-year run as a college basketball player. (Photo property Whitman Athletic Department)

Whitman College kicked off its inaugural Senior Awards Series for athletics Wednesday, and the first honor had a Coupeville connection.

The Blues women’s basketball squad, led by former Wolf Makana Stone, was tabbed as the winner of the George Ball Award.

That honor is awarded to one team which best “represents the mission of Whitman College and the athletics department and that demonstrates one or more of the ideals of sportsmanship, including fairness, civility, honesty, respect, and responsibility.”

Stone and Co. went 26-3 this season, won the Northwest Conference regular season crown with a 15-1 mark, and were preparing to play in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA D-III tourney when the COVID-19 pandemic closed down college sports.

Coupeville’s progeny ended her four-year run in Walla Walla by being named league MVP, followed by notching All-Region and All-American honors.

Whitman will continue to hand out awards in virtual ceremonies each day through May 26.

Read Full Post »

Amanda Fabrizi is one of just 23 CHS girls to have scored 200 points in a basketball season. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Megan Smith could fill the hoop up. (Photo courtesy Smith)

Sisters Lexie (left) and Brittany Black each own two of the 50 best individual scoring seasons in Wolf girls basketball history. (Photo courtesy Laura Black)

This isn’t rocket science.

The most-sustained run of team success the Coupeville High School girls basketball program has enjoyed came in the 2000’s.

While the Wolves launched in 1974, and put together some very-strong runs in the mid and late ’90s, all three of the state tourney banners they own were captured between 2002-2005.

So, it’s no surprise that when you compile the 50 best single-season scoring totals put up by a Wolf girls hoops player, 21 of those campaigns came between 2001-2009.

Other than that, it’s fairly well-balanced, with 15 slots occupied by players from the ’90s, and seven performances apiece coming from the ’80s and the 2010’s.

There are two CHS girls who sit atop the pile, with Brianne King and Zenovia Barron both landing in the top 50 four times.

Ann Pettit, Makana Stone, Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby, and Megan Smith have three slots apiece, with Maureen Wetmore, Tina Lyness, Judy Marti, Lexie Black, Erica Lamb, Terry Perkins, and Brittany Black notching two appearances.

Overall, 29 players have combined to account for the top 50 individual seasons.

Now, there are a couple of small caveats, though the latter matters more than the former.

We have no scoring stats for that first modern-day team, the 1974-1975 squad.

Though, based on other early scoring totals, I’m 99.99992% sure no one from that season would make this list.

More troubling is the fact we’re missing 2-3 games each from three different seasons, so our totals for 2003-2004, 2005-2006, and 2006-2007 are not fully complete.

That affects four players.

Lexie Black, Vanessa Davis, and Brittany Black each have a season where they make the top 50, but could be higher on the chart with those missing games.

I’ve marked those campaigns with asterisks below.

The other person being possibly short-changed is Megan Smith, who I have with 161 points for her freshman season in 2006-2007 (minus two missing games), which is just 13 points off of cracking the top 50.

While she has the #10, #16, and #25 seasons, if we had complete numbers from 06-07, it’s very likely she joins King and Barron in the four-timers club.

With that being said, the 50 best CHS girls single-season scoring totals:

 

Brianne King – (446) – (2000-2001)
Brianne King – (442) – (2002-2003)
Makana Stone – (427) – (2015-2016)
Brianne King – (386) – (2001-2002)
Zenovia Barron – (378) – (1996-1997)
Zenovia Barron – (376) – (1997-1998)
Makana Stone – (367) – (2014-2015)
Ann Pettit – (363) – (1997-1998)
Amanda Allmer – (331) – (1994-1995)
Megan Smith – (327) – (2008-2009)
Ann Pettit – (317) – (1996-1997)
Terry Perkins – (314) – (1986-1987)
Judy Marti – (312) – (1983-1984)
Marlene Grasser – (307) – (1986-1987)
Tina Lyness – (299) – (1999-2000)
Megan Smith – (299) – (2009-2010)
Lexie Black – (295) – (2004-2005)
Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby – (280) – (2000-2001)
Brianne King – (275) – (1999-2000)
Tina Barker – (274) – (1986-1987)
Zenovia Barron – (274) – (1995-1996)
Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby – (266) – (2001-2002)
Kristan Hurlburt – (263) – (1981-1982)
Sarah Mouw – (259) – (2001-2002)
Megan Smith – (255) – (2007-2008)
Ann Pettit – (252) – (1995-1996)
Makana Stone – (248) – (2013-2014)
Erica Lamb – (247) – (2002-2003)
Zenovia Barron – (242) – (1994-1995)
Lexie Black – (236) – (2003-2004) – **
Tina Lyness – (221) – (1998-1999)
Jen Canfield – (220) – (1996-1997)
Ashley Manker – (218) – (2009-2010)
Amy Mouw – (216) – (2002-2003)
Maureen Wetmore – (212) – (1998-1999)
Linda Cheshier – (210) – (1991-1992)
Brittany Black – (209) – (2004-2005)
Judy Marti – (201) – (1982-1983)
Amanda Fabrizi – (200) – (2013-2014)
Vanessa Davis – (194) – (2003-2004) – **
Terry Perkins – (194) – (1984-1985)
Emily Vracin – (194) – (1991-1992)
Whitney Clark – (188) – (2004-2005)
Taniel Lamb – (188) – (2004-2005)
Misty Sellgren – (184) – (1992-1993)
Ashley Ellsworth-Bagby – (183) – (1999-2000)
Kailey Kellner – (180) – (2016-2017)
Brittany Black – (177) – (2005-2006) – **
Maureen Wetmore – (177) – (1997-1998)
Erica Lamb – (174) – (2001-2002)

Read Full Post »

Makana Stone, here with mom Eileen, continues to rake in college basketball honors. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Coupeville’s Makana Stone ends her college career as one of the best basketball players in the country.

The former Wolf, now a senior at Whitman College, was one of 25 players honored Tuesday when the D3hoops.com All-American teams were announced.

Already tabbed as the Northwest Conference Player of the Year and a First-Team All-West Region pick, Stone was one of five players to receive Honorable Mention status.

Erica DeCandido of Tufts University (Massachusetts) was selected as the NCAA D-III national player of the year.

Berea College (Kentucky) freshman Aaliyah Hampton was tabbed as Rookie of the Year, while Brian Morehouse, who led Hope College (Michigan) to an undefeated season, was named Coach of the Year.

The only West Coast player honored, Stone averaged 15.1 points and 8.3 rebounds a night as Whitman went 26-3 this season.

She collected 409 points, 225 rebounds, 37 assists, 26 steals, and 26 blocks, while shooting 166-316 (52.5%) from the floor and 74-96 (77.1%) from the free-throw line.

The Blues won their first two games in the NCAA tourney, and were hours away from playing in the Sweet 16 when the season was prematurely ended by the coronavirus.

During her four years as a Blue, Stone played in 110 games, including making a program-record 92 starts.

She finished as the #5 scorer (1,337 points) and #2 rebounder (837 caroms) in Whitman women’s basketball history.

Read Full Post »

Jasmine Nastali was part of the fastest CMS girls 4 x 1 relay team of the past decade. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Aram Leyva blows by on the inside. (Pat Kelley photos)

Ashleigh Battaglia sticks the landing.

Danny Conlisk (left) and Gabe Eck, younger but still just as speedy. (Dawnelle Conlisk photo)

Welcome to the digital arena.

With athletes driven inside by the ongoing battle with coronavirus, you have to find your competitions where you can.

Today, thanks to records kept by athletic.net, we present the “Coupeville Middle School Virtual Olympics,” featuring Wolf athletes from 2009-2019 – the seasons covered by the site.

There are 98 medal winners (51 girls and 47 boys) with Lathom Kelley and Chris Battaglia leading the way with five medals apiece.

In terms of standing on top of the podium, however, no one can match Makana Stone and Alex Murdy, who each bring home four gold medals.

Others to claim multiple titles include Lindsey Roberts, Emma Smith, Carolyn Lhamon, Danny Conlisk, Jared Helmstadter, Kelley, and Battaglia, who all exit with a pair of golds.

Before we get to the stats, a couple of quick side notes.

One, there are a couple of events where there aren’t a gold, silver, and bronze winner, as only 1-2 people were listed by athletic.net.

Which is probably far from reality, but we go with what we have.

As you go through the top times and throws and jumps, special props to Savina Wells, bronze medal winner in the high jump, as she’s the only 6th grader to crack the top three in any event.

And yes, we’re going to do a high school meet next.

With that, down to the field:

 

GIRLS:

60 — Ja’Kenya Hoskins (1st) 8.90 – 2018; Ja’Tarya Hoskins (2nd) 9.12 – 2016; Emily Fiedler (3rd) 9.41 – 2017

100 — Sandra Lund-Olsen (1st) 13.63 – 2012; Sylvia Hurlburt (2nd) 13.88 – 2012; Mallory Kortuem (3rd) 14.08 – 2016

200 — Makana Stone (1st) 28.00 – 2012; Lindsey Roberts (2nd) 28.44 – 2015; S. Lund-Olsen (3rd) 28.85 – 2012

400 — Stone (1st) 1:01.07 – 2012; Anna Bailey (2nd) 1:06.96 – 2009; Carlie Rosenkrance (3rd) 1:08.69 – 2013

800 — Morgan Pease (1st) 2:39.46 – 2016; Jillian Pape (2nd) 2:42.59 – 2013; Abby Parker (3rd) 2:43.63 – 2014

1600 — Pape (1st) 5:48.98 – 2013; Mattea Miller (2nd) 5:59.60 – 2013; Lauren Bayne (3rd) 6:13.00 – 2014

75 Hurdles — Madison Tisa McPhee (1st) 12.61 – 2009; Rosenkrance (2nd) 13.44 – 2013; Roberts (3rd) 13.76 – 2014

100 Hurdles — Roberts (1st) 17.45 – 2015; Cassidy Moody (2nd) 19.73 – 2015; Claire Mayne (3rd) 19.86 – 2019

200 Hurdles — Kortuem (1st-tie) 36.03 – 2016; Audrianna Shaw (1st-tie) 36.03 – 2018; Bella Velasco (3rd) 37.24 – 2017

4 x 100 Relay — Jasmine Nastali, Ashlie Shank, Emma Smith, Roberts (1st) 57.07 – 2015; Nicole Becker, Hannah Christensen, Jai’Lysa Hoskins, Maddy Summerill (2nd) 57.92 – 2009; Ja’Tarya Hoskins, Lucy Sandahl, Moody, Kortuem (3rd) 58.81 – 2016

4 x 200 Relay — Stone, Marina Bruland, Kirsten Pelroy, Hurlburt (1st) 1:55.43 – 2012; Miller, Tiffany Briscoe, Rosenkrance, Lauren Grove (2nd) 2:02.05 – 2013; Becker, Christensen, Jai’Lysa Hoskins, Summerill (3rd) 2:04.87 – 2009

4 x 400 Relay — Lily Zustiak, Mikaela Labrador, Helen Sinclair, Ashleigh Battaglia (1st) 5:18.86 – 2016; Alana Mihill, Abigail Ramirez, Cristina McGrath, Mary Milnes (2nd) 5:28.61 – 2018

Shot Put (6-lb) — Carolyn Lhamon (1st) 32-11.50 – 2019; Pease (2nd) 29-02.25 – 2016; Noelle Daigneault (3rd) 26-05 (3rd) – 2018

Shot Put (8-lb) — Lhamon (1st) 26-00 – 2019; E. Smith (2nd) 25-11 – 2015; Skyler Lawrence (3rd) 25-10.75 – 2013

Shot Put (4-kg) — E. Smith (1st) 27-03.75 – 2015; Lawrence (2nd) 21-00 – 2013; Oliana Stange (3rd) 20-11 – 2015

Discus — Kylie Chernikoff (1st) 78-00 – 2017; Monica Vidoni (2nd) 69-07 – 2011; Lawrence (3rd-tie) 64-02 – 2013; Jessica Riddle (3rd-tie) 64-02 – 2009

Javelin — Jillian Mayne (1st) 61-01 – 2016; Zoe Trujillo (2nd) 59-07 – 2016; Fiedler (3rd) 56-11 – 2017

High Jump — Moody (1st) 4-10 – 2016; Ryanne Knoblich (2nd) 4-06 – 2019; Savina Wells (3rd) 4-03 – 2019

Long Jump — Stone (1st) 13-08.50 – 2012; Summerill (2nd) 13-08 – 2009; Knoblich (3rd-tie) 13-07 – 2019; Ja’Kenya Hoskins (3rd-tie) 13-07 – 2018

 

BOYS:

60 — Sean Toomey-Stout (1st) 8.04 – 2016; Nick Wielandt (2nd) 8.39 – 2016; Lucious Binnings (3rd) 8.43 – 2018

100 — Danny Conlisk (1st) 12.13 – 2015; Gabe Eck (2nd) 12.34 – 2015; Jared Helmstadter (3rd) 12.45 – 2012

200 — Alex Murdy (1st) 24.94 – 2019; G. Eck (2nd) 25.82 – 2015; Caleb Meyer (3rd) 25.89 – 2018

400 — Helmstadter (1st) 58.20 – 2012; Jacob Smith (2nd) 59.45 – 2014; Joshua Centamore (3rd) 1:00.47 – 2010

800 — Matt Hampton (1st) 2:23.12 – 2011; Lathom Kelley (2nd) 2:24.67 – 2012; Josh Crebbin (3rd) 2:25.99 – 2009

1600 — Conlisk (1st) 5:14.57 – 2015; Chris Battaglia (2nd) 5:14.74 – 2015; Aram Leyva (3rd) 5:15.65 – 2016

75 Hurdles — Jean Lund-Olsen (1st) 13.38 – 2016; Jake Mitten (2nd) 14.49 – 2016; Chris Cernick (3rd) 14.68 – 2016

110 Hurdles — Zane Bundy (1st) 17.74 – 2011; Cameron Toomey-Stout (2nd) 18.73 – 2014; Jesse Hester (3rd) 19.05 – 2014

200 Hurdles — Helmstadter (1st) 28.34 – 2011; Cernick (2nd) 33.68 – 2016; Ben Smith (3rd) 34.90 – 2017

4 x 100 Relay — Reiley Araceley, Dominic Coffman, Joven Light, Murdy (1st) 50.81 – 2019; DJ Stadler, Light, Araceley, Aiden Burdge (2nd) 51.28 – 2018; Helmstadter, Ryan Griggs, Dalton Martin, Kelley (3rd) 51.94 – 2012

4 x 200 Relay — Binnings, Timothy Ursu, Gabe Shaw, Stadler (1st) 1:53.36 – 2018; Josue Payan-Lopez, Nathan Lamb, Danny Savalza, Luke Pelant (2nd) 1:54.54 – 2009; C. Battaglia, Ty Eck, G. Eck, Uriah Kastner (3rd) 1:57.25 – 2014

4 x 400 Relay — Leyva, Tucker Hall, Mitten, James Mayne (1st) 4:36.17 — 2016; Coffman, Ty Duddridge, Aiden Anderson, Ty Hamilton (2nd) 5:17.87 – 2018

Shot Put (8-lb) — Kelley (1st) 38-07.50 – 2012; D. Martin (2nd) 35-01.50 – 2012; Logan Martin (3rd) 34-05 – 2018

Shot Put (4-kg) — Kelley (1st) 36-04.50 – 2012; C. Battaglia (2nd) 35-00.50 – 2015; D. Martin (3rd) 34-03.25 – 2012

Discus (1-kg) — C. Battaglia (1st) 119-03 – 2015; Kelley (2nd) 112-04 – 2012; Skyler Martin (3rd) 102-11 – 2009

Discus (1.6-kg) — Jimmy Myers (1st) 90-10 — 2013; Uriel Liquidano (2nd) 88-10 – 2013; L. Martin (3rd) 85-00 – 2017

Javelin — L. Martin (1st) 116-10 – 2018; Stadler (2nd) 112-05 – 2018; Gabe Carlson (3rd) 89-06 – 2016

High Jump — Murdy (1st-tie) 5-06; C. Battaglia (1st-tie) 5-06 – 2015; Jake Mitten (3rd) 5-02.50 – 2017

Long Jump — Murdy (1st-tie) 17-09 – 2019; G. Eck (1st-tie) 17-09 – 2015; Toomey-Stout (3rd) 17-07.75 – 2016

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »