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Posts Tagged ‘volunteers’

The pitch calls.

The Central Whidbey Soccer Club is looking for volunteer coaches to run U10 boys and U12 girls teams.

No prior coaching experience is required.

If the CWSC is unable to find coaches by the end of the week, it will have to combine its boys and girls U10 and U12 programs, making both co-ed.

If interested in launching, or continuing, your coaching career, contact Bill Sites at vicepresident@centralwhidbeysoccer.com.

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Central Whidbey Little League softball players celebrate a win. (Jackie Saia photo)

Coupeville’s Rhododendron Park is a jewel among local little league facilities.

But, unless new volunteers step up to keep Central Whidbey Little League humming along, parents of softball and baseball players may spend more time driving North and South than enjoying their own diamonds.

That’s the reality, as CWLL will lose most of its board at the conclusion of this season, with the children and grandchildren of current volunteers “aging out” and moving on to high school ball.

League officials are putting out the call for fresh blood, with the promise current volunteers will help prepare newbies for what awaits them.

The statement released Thursday by CWLL President Gordon McMillan:

 

Good Morning!

We are reaching out to all of you with the hopes that you will consider getting more involved with Central Whidbey Little League.

As we are winding down the 2021 season, it is now time to look forward … to next season and beyond.

Yes, it may seem a bit early, but your current board is concerned about next season and feel it is imperative to share our thoughts with you.

Your current board is presently made up of approximately 10-12 active members.

And, the majority will be leaving the board after this season as our kids and grandkids will be ‘aging out’.

Our kids will no longer be eligible to play little league baseball/softball.

Most of our kids and grandkids will be involved with high school athletics/events/clubs in some form or another, and we will be wanting to watch and participate in those events with them.

What does this mean?

Quite frankly, without new volunteers to fill these positions, CWLL may have a very challenging situation and may face some very difficult and painful decisions.

This includes players/families may have to apply to participate in the North Whidbey and/or the South Whidbey leagues IF these leagues will allow.

Board positions that will be vacant at the end of this season:

President
Vice President
Player Agent
Treasurer
Secretary
Safety Officer
Communications Director
Concession Stand Organizer (*May be filled but could use assistance*)
Umpire Organizer
Field Prep
Equipment/Purchasing
Sponsorship/Donations (*May be filled but could use assistance*)

CWLL usually begins ‘gearing up’ for the new season with monthly (Zoom at this time) meetings in September and then weekly meetings after the first of the year going through early April.

Then back to every other week until the end of the season.

Some of your 2021 board has volunteered to assist/teach/guide, but will be unable to ‘take the lead’ so they can be involved with their high schoolers.

If you have questions, please do not hesitate to contact us and we will respond at once.

Thank you very much for your consideration.

Respectfully,

Your 2021 CWLL Board of Directors

 

For more info on CWLL:

Home (centralwhidbeylittleleague.com)

 

To contact the CWLL, email:

centralwhidbeyll@gmail.com

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Central Whidbey’s John Rachal fires the ball back in during a playoff game. (Photo by JohnsPhotos.net)

Celebrating during a run to the state tourney are (l to r) Madison McMillan, Allison Nastali, Chloe Marzocca, and Savina Wells. (Photo by Jackie Saia)

Central Whidbey Little League finds itself at a crossroads.

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic prevented any games from being played this spring, and the future is hazy.

While CWLL is moving forward with the hope of returning its players to the diamond in 2021, a looming crisis involving a lack of volunteers could become a major issue.

Despite being the smallest league in the region, with 90-100 players, Central Whidbey is required to have the same compliment of board members and volunteers as bigger leagues.

North and South Whidbey, Anacortes, La Conner, Sedro-Woolley, and Burlington have larger parent bases to draw from, while CWLL has had to scramble to fill all of its positions in recent years.

That may get harder very soon, unless a new generation steps up.

“CWLL finds itself in a very challenging position,” said President Gordon McMillan. “Probably not unlike many other non-profits and youth organizations in these unique times.

“And we are facing another huge challenge; the majority of the current board and volunteers have children (or grandchildren in my case!) that are “aging out” of little league in the next year or so,” he added.

“We have very few volunteers that have younger kids playing; with no line of succession, it is clear, in my opinion, CWLL may very well not survive.”

If Central Whidbey is unable to fully staff up, its players might have to try and latch on with North or South Whidbey in the near future, something which could prove difficult – especially if those organizations decide they can’t handle the influx.

“This would be tragic,” McMillan said.

The league president would hate to see Coupeville’s ballfields sit silent.

“CWLL has by far the most beautiful setting,” McMillan said. “I like to call Rhody Park our “Field of Dreams.”

“Island County Parks have been very accommodating and generous in their support of CWLL and it should be duly noted. Rhody belongs to all of us … and the county should be recognized!”

Baseball and softball have a place deep in McMillan’s heart, a big part of the reason he and others have worked so hard to make CWLL the success it is today.

“Little League has touched so many of our lives, the vast majority in a positive manner, I believe,” he said.

“Not every child can play football or basketball, but I venture a guess that every child has picked up a ball, a bat, a glove, and played some sort of baseball/softball/Wiffle ball … neighborhood … sandlot … school PE … or little league.”

For McMillan, little league made an impact on his life, first as a player, then as a coach and official through two generations of his offspring.

“Little League has been a passion of mine since 1956, when I first “made the team” in North Vancouver, BC,” he said.

“I have coached three of my kids and one granddaughter (Madison) and only hope they have, or will have, the same warm and wonderful memories as I have, and look back someday, not remembering the wins and losses, but the fun, camaraderie, and life lessons

“Then, and only then, did we, as coaches, umpires, administrators, concession operators, field maintenance crews, score keepers, spectators, etc. do a good job!”

 

If you’d like to become a volunteer, or have any suggestions for CWLL officials as they navigate the waters ahead, contact McMillan at centralwhidbeyll@gmail.com.

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Central Whidbey Little League needs softball and baseball coaches. (Jackie Saia photo)

Now’s the time to get in the game.

With spring approaching, Central Whidbey Little League is in dire need of coaches for its baseball and softball teams.

CWLL is looking for 4-5 more volunteers, who will primarily be working with players in the 8-10 age group.

If interested, contact CWLL President Gordon McMillan at (206) 550-7146.

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   Katelin McCormick, a freshman this year, got her start on the pitch thanks to the Central Whidbey Soccer Club, as this flashback pic proves. (Wendy McCormick photo)

Do it, for the kids.

Have a lot of soccer knowledge? Or just the basics, but you want to help shape the destiny of Central Whidbey’s young booters anyway?

Old pro or first timer, the Central Whidbey Soccer Club is in desperate need of coaches.

“If we don’t get coaches for our U-8 coed, U-10 boys, U-12 boys, and U-12 girls teams, there are going to be a lot of very disappointed young soccer players,” said Michelle Cernick.

The soccer club, which has been a vibrant part of Coupeville’s sports scene, almost shut down this year because of a lack of volunteers. But a small, but determined group of parents rallied to revive it.

Now the players are in place, and the first games kick off Saturday, Sept. 8.

But, with just two coaches currently in place, things are once again dicey.

If you’re interested in helping out, and want to get that nice, warm glow in your chest in return, drop an email to president@centralwhidbeysoccer.com.

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